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Latest Obsidian use in Mesoamerica Stories

New Sourcing Technique Detects Obsidian In Seconds
2013-09-10 09:27:02

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Obsidian is a naturally occurring volcanic glass with a smooth, hard surface. It is far sharper than a surgical scalpel when fractured, making the glass a highly desirable raw material for crafting stone tools for almost all of human history. Found in East Africa, the earliest obsidian tools are nearly two million years old, and today, doctors still use obsidian scalpels in specialized medical procedures. The chemical composition of...

Shifting trade Routes May Have Been Root Cause Of Mayan Decline
2012-05-24 10:44:28

Brett Smith for RedOrbit.com The end of the classic Mayan civilization in the lowlands of Mesoamerica was likely expedited by shifting trade routes that started to bring valuable goods to coastal regions instead of the inland city-states of the ancient Native Americans. While the cause of this decline is still shrouded in mystery, most scholars consider the period of the Maya Collapse to be between the 8th and 9th centuries. During this time, the highly sophisticated societies that...

2009-06-22 13:57:37

Archaeologists have used stone tools to answer many questions about human ancestors in both the distant and near past and now they are analyzing the origin of obsidian flakes to better understand how people settled and interacted in the inhospitable Kuril Islands.Using X-ray fluorescence spectrometers, archaeologists from the University of Washington and the Smithsonian Institution have found the origin of 131 flakes of obsidian, a volcanic glass. These small flakes were discarded after stone...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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