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Latest Occupational health psychology Stories

Mentally Demanding Jobs May Keep Your Mind Sharp Long After You Retire
2014-03-26 14:11:36

University of Michigan A mentally demanding job may stress you out today but can provide important benefits after you retire, according to a new study. "Based on data spanning 18 years, our study suggests that certain kinds of challenging jobs have the potential to enhance and protect workers' mental functioning in later life," said Gwenith Fisher, a faculty associate at the University of Michigan Institute for Social Research and assistant professor of psychology at Colorado State...

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2012-08-01 18:00:17

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study shows that mild mental health issues could increase the risk of death. Even a condition as mild or feeling anxious, depressed or lonely could increase the risk of an early death, says to the new study. According to the British study, more than 68,000 people who said they experienced these symptoms were found to be more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases, cancer or other injuries. According to their numbers,...

2012-08-01 12:56:50

Risk is raised even at low levels of distress, warn experts The risk was raised even at lower levels of distress that would not usually come to the attention of mental health services, say the authors. Approximately a quarter of the general population suffer from these minor symptoms of anxiety and depression. Previous studies investigating the association between psychological distress and mortality have been small and unable to reliably measure thresholds of risk. In a study...

2011-04-01 07:00:00

WASHINGTON, April 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The American Psychological Association (APA)'s 2011 Psychologically Healthy Workplace Conference will be held April 8-9 in Chicago. WHAT: The Psychologically Healthy Workplace Conference brings together business and psychology, showing how it can create healthy workplace cultures that support employee well-being and performance. Topics explored include workplace flexibility as a business strategy, incentives and recognition, wellness...

2011-03-15 13:40:02

The psychosocial quality of work determines whether employment has benefits for mental health: results from a longitudinal national household panel survey The impact on mental health of a badly paid, poorly supported, or short term job can be as harmful as no job at all, indicates research published online in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Because being in work is associated with better mental health than unemployment, government policies have tended to focus on the risks posed by...

2011-01-04 13:46:59

In the first combat-zone study of its kind, a research team led by Michigan State University found that soldiers with a positive outlook in the most traumatic situations were less likely to suffer health problems such as anxiety and depression. The study, which surveyed Army troops fighting in Iraq, could have implications for police officers, firefighters and others who regularly deal with traumatic events such as death. Training these first-responders to think in less catastrophic terms...

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2010-05-06 09:35:00

Psychosocial work environment and risk of ischemic heart disease in women High pressure jobs boost young women's risk of heart disease, finds a large study of female nurses published May 5 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Previous research has indicated a link between a demanding job and heart disease risk, but the findings have been largely confined to men. The research team assessed the impact of work pressure and degree of personal influence in the workplace on the heart health...

2009-11-03 11:30:00

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 3 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- While fewer Los Angeles residents this year report that money, work and the economy cause significant stress in their lives, their levels of stress remain considerably high. More than 50 percent of city residents remain stressed by one or more of these three sources, a cause of concern for psychologists who worry about the effects of long-term stress and how it can contribute to chronic health disorders. In a survey released today by the...

2009-10-21 09:27:40

Experts at The University of Nottingham say our stress levels at work peak when we reach about 50 to 55 years of age and decrease as we head towards retirement. In the first comprehensive report into age related stress and health at work to be carried out in Britain researchers from the Institute of Work, Health and Organizations also found that the effects of stress in our working lives can stay with us well into retirement. The research, led by Amanda Griffiths, Professor of Occupational...

2009-10-13 14:48:42

Those who stay in their original field fare best mentally, report finds Retirees who transition from full-time work into a temporary or part-time job experience fewer major diseases and are able to function better day-to-day than people who stop working altogether, according to a national study. And the findings were significant even after controlling for people's physical and mental health before retirement. The study's authors refer to this transition between career and complete retirement...


Word of the Day
holluschickie
  • A 'bachelor seal'; a young male seal which is prevented from mating by its herd's older males (mated bulls defending their territory).
This comes from the Russian word for 'bachelors.'
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