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Latest Ocean acidification Stories

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2010-10-12 23:00:21

Contrary to some previous, highly publicized, reports, ocean acidification is not likely to worsen the hearing of whales and other animals, according to a Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientist who studies sound propagation in the ocean.Tim Duda, of WHOI's Applied Ocean Physics & Engineering Department, undertook a study in response to warnings that as the ocean becomes more acidic"”due to elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2)--noise from ships will be...

2010-09-30 17:03:29

The future of the world's coral reefs in a time of dramatic change and increasing human pressures is the focus of a major scientific symposium in Canberra, Australia,on October 7 and 8, 2010. Leading marine scientists from Australia, Britain, the USA, Israel and other countries will report on the latest findings on the state of the world's reefs and their prospects for survival in the coming decades. "Coral Reefs in a Changing Environment" celebrates more than 80 years of Australian coral...

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2010-08-20 09:46:37

Emissions of carbon dioxide are causing ocean acidification as well as global warming. Scientists have previously used computer simulations to quantify how curbing of carbon dioxide emissions would mitigate climate impacts. New computer simulations have now examined the likely effects of mitigation scenarios on ocean acidification trends. They show that both the peak year of emissions and post-peak reduction rates influence how much ocean acidity increases by 2100. Changes in ocean pH over...

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2010-08-06 12:15:00

It has been widely reported that the build up of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the air, which is caused by human behavior, will likely lead to climate change and have major implications for life on earth. But less focus has been given to global warming's evil twin, ocean acidification, which occurs when CO2 lowers the pH of water bodies, thus making them more acidic. This lesser known phenomenon may have catastrophic effects on all sea life.Oysters in PerilInna Sokolova, associate professor of...

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2010-07-26 12:57:15

The icy Arctic waters around Norway's archipelago of Svalbard are facing the threat of acidity. The waters have always absorbed part of the carbon dioxide present in the air, making them acidic.  However, the scientific community is getting worried about the acidification harming marine life with CO2 levels rising. At a tiny coal mine village turned scientific outpost just 745 miles from the North Pole, researchers from nine European countries conducted an unprecedented effort in July...

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2010-07-07 08:15:36

Humanity's rising CO2 emissions could have a significant impact on the world's fish populations according to groundbreaking new research carried out in Australia. Baby fish may become easy meat for predators as the world's oceans become more acidic due to CO2 fallout from human activity, an international team of researchers has discovered. In a series of experiments reported in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), the team found that as carbon levels...

2010-07-01 14:01:58

Lack of sufficient iron may be a significant factor in controlling massive blooms of Emiliania huxleyi, a globally important species of marine algae or phytoplankton, according to research led by researchers at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) in Southampton. Emiliania huxleyi is a species of coccolithophore found in oceans all around the world, from the tropics to the Arctic Ocean. Coccolithophore blooms often develop during the summer when a blanket of water called the thermocline...

2010-06-29 02:39:56

The idea to sequester carbon is gaining support as a way to avoid global warming. For example, the European Union plans to invest billions of Euros within the next ten years to develop carbon capture and storage whereby CO2 will be extracted at power plants and other combustion sites and stored underground. But how effective is this procedure and what are the long-term consequences of leakage for the oceans and climate? A Niels Bohr Institute researcher has now cast light upon these issues....

2010-06-18 13:34:13

Numerous studies are documenting the growing effects of climate change, carbon dioxide, pollution and other human-related phenomena on the world's oceans. But most of those have studied single, isolated sources of pollution and other influences. Now, a marine geochemist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has published a report in the latest issue of the journal Science that evaluates the total impact of such factors on the ocean and considers what the future might hold. "What...

2010-06-08 13:04:00

WASHINGTON, June 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- NASA's first dedicated oceanographic field campaign goes to sea June 15 to take an up-close look at how changing conditions in the Arctic are affecting the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems that play a critical role in global climate change. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) The "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment" mission, or ICESCAPE, will investigate the impacts of...


Latest Ocean acidification Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

Reef0607
2012-04-03 17:24:13

Rice Coral, (Montipora capitata), also known as Pore Coral, is a species of stony coral in the Acroporidae family. It is found in the tropical north and central areas of the Pacific Ocean at depths down to 66 feet. It is common in the waters near Hawaii, especially where the sea is turbulent. This is a reef-building species that forms colonies. As it matures, it develops tree-like branches. Its corallites are tiny and well separated by a calcareous (calcium carbonate) skeleton. The walls...

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