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Latest Ocean acidification Stories

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2010-06-08 15:39:13

NASA's first dedicated oceanographic field campaign goes to sea June 15 to take an up-close look at how changing conditions in the Arctic are affecting the ocean's chemistry and ecosystems that play a critical role in global climate change. The "Impacts of Climate on Ecosystems and Chemistry of the Arctic Pacific Environment" mission, or ICESCAPE, will investigate the impacts of climate change on the ecology and biogeochemistry of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. A key focus is how changes in...

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2010-05-19 08:10:00

European Science Foundation presents ocean acidification report at EU Maritime Day 2010 Ten years ago, ocean acidification was a phenomenon only known to small group of ocean scientists. It's now recognized as the hidden partner of climate change, prompting calls for an urgent, substantial reduction in carbon emissions to reduce future impacts. The 'Impacts of Ocean Acidification' science policy briefing presented by the European Science Foundation on May 20 for European Maritime Day 2010...

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2010-04-22 11:40:00

WASHINGTON -- The changing chemistry of the world's oceans is a growing global problem, says the summary of a congressionally requested study by the National Research Council, which adds that unless man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are substantially curbed, or atmospheric CO2 is controlled by some other means, the ocean will continue to become more acidic. The long-term consequences of ocean acidification on marine life are unknown, but many ecosystem changes are expected to result....

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2010-04-20 14:30:00

Acidifying oceans dramatically stunt growth of already threatened shellfish As we prepare to celebrate Earth Day on April 22, we can add another species, one of widespread ecological and economic importance, to the list of the beleaguered. From East Coast to West and around the world, global warming and its effects have descended upon shellfish reefs, particularly those formed by the Olympia oyster. More than one-third of the world's human-caused carbon dioxide emissions have entered the...

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2010-03-29 06:34:14

The rise in human emissions of carbon dioxide is driving fundamental and dangerous changes in the chemistry and ecosystems of the world's oceans, international marine scientists warned today. "Ocean conditions are already more extreme than those experienced by marine organisms and ecosystems for millions of years," the researchers say in the latest issue of the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution (TREE). "This emphasizes the urgent need to adopt policies that drastically reduce CO2...

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2010-03-26 06:10:00

Coral reefs are slowly becoming extinct and could disappear entirely within the next century -- which could have disastrous results all over the world, experts claim. According to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) statistics published in a March 25 Associated Press (AP) article, roughly 19-percent of the Earth's coral reefs have already disappeared, and an additional 15-percent could be gone within the next two decades. Furthermore, Dr. Kent Carpenter, a professor at Old...

2010-03-24 13:52:08

Climate change is just one of the problems With climate change at the front and center of today's political debates, the other indicators of the Earth's environmental health are not always top of mind in the public conscience. Featured as part of the cover story of Scientific American magazine's April issue, which hits newsstands on Wednesday, March 24, U of M professor Jon Foley makes the case for why we need to pay more attention to all environmental processes that contribute to the Earth's...

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2010-03-01 07:20:00

Fossil corals, up to half a million years old, are providing fresh hope that coral reefs may be able to withstand the huge stresses imposed on them by today's human activity. Reef ecosystems were able to persist through massive environmental changes imposed by sharply falling sea levels during previous ice ages, an international scientific team has found. This provides new hope for their capacity to endure the increasing human impacts forecast for the 21st century. In the world's first study...

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2010-02-25 12:51:37

Results of Northwest Atlantic Field Program Could Be Applied Worldwide A three-year field program now underway is measuring carbon distributions and primary productivity in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean to help scientists worldwide determine the impacts of a changing climate on ocean biology and biogeochemistry. The study, Climate Variability on the East Coast (CliVEC), will also help validate ocean color satellite measurements and refine biogeochemistry models of ocean...

2010-02-04 14:29:09

The increasing acidity of the world's oceans - and that acidity's growing threat to marine species - are definitive proof that the atmospheric carbon dioxide that is causing climate change is also negatively affecting the marine environment, says world-renowned Antarctic marine biologist Jim McClintock, Ph.D., professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Department of Biology. "The oceans are a sink for the carbon dioxide that is released into the atmosphere," says McClintock,...


Latest Ocean acidification Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

Reef0607
2012-04-03 17:24:13

Rice Coral, (Montipora capitata), also known as Pore Coral, is a species of stony coral in the Acroporidae family. It is found in the tropical north and central areas of the Pacific Ocean at depths down to 66 feet. It is common in the waters near Hawaii, especially where the sea is turbulent. This is a reef-building species that forms colonies. As it matures, it develops tree-like branches. Its corallites are tiny and well separated by a calcareous (calcium carbonate) skeleton. The walls...

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