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Latest Ocean acidification Stories

3297e4a74a1612b2505d74b6c20b48481
2010-01-10 13:08:21

A study by the University of Exeter provides the first evidence that coral reefs can recover from the devastating effects of climate change. To be published Monday January 11 in the journal PLOS One, the research shows for the first time that coral reefs located in marine reserves can recover from the impacts of global warming. Scientists and environmentalists have warned that coral reefs may not be able to recover from the damage caused by climate change and that these unique environments...

a4eaeda0123dff7c4356d5f88b21fb851
2010-01-08 13:22:59

The impact on levels of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere by the decaying remains of a group of marine creatures that includes starfish and sea urchin has been significantly underestimated. "Climate models must take this carbon sink into account," says Mario Lebrato, lead author of the study. The work was done when he was at the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (NOCS) and affiliated with the University of Southampton's School of Ocean and Earth Science (SOES); he is now at the...

0cc92237dd18bf5fe2db40cd54c332121
2009-12-22 10:54:03

There is little doubt among scientists now that human carbon dioxide emissions are warming the planet. Another problem of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is that CO2 is being absorbed by the oceans, which increases seawater acidity (lowers the seawater pH). This process, termed 'ocean acidification', has received growing scientific and public interest because it threatens certain groups of marine organisms, including corals. Only recently have researchers realized that man-made carbon...

566795b3f9e5e842cb8e705c6ee7d8a71
2009-12-21 06:50:39

A study published by U.S. scientists on Sunday said pollution has caused the world's oceans to become noisier, causing more harmful effects to whales, dolphins, and other marine life. These effects include death and serious injury caused by brain hemorrhages or other tissue trauma, strandings and beachings, temporary and permanent hearing loss or impairment, displacement from preferred habitat and disruption of feeding, breeding, nursing, communication, sensing and other behaviors vital to...

ca8bdecd6fa81858f85176dfd24fa1fa1
2009-12-14 13:34:50

A report released Monday at the UN climate summit showed that climate change threatens the survival of dozens of animal species from the emperor penguins to Australian koalas, AFP reported. The study from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), an intergovernmental group, warned that rising sea levels, ocean acidification and shrinking polar ice are taking a heavy toll on species already struggling to cope with pollution and shrinking habitats. Wendy Foden, an IUCN...

2009-12-03 22:22:54

An international team of scientists led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) has developed a new method of measuring the absorption of CO2 by the oceans and mapped for the first time CO2 uptake for the entire North Atlantic. Published tomorrow in the journal Science, the peer-reviewed study will greatly improve our understanding of the natural ocean 'sinks' and enable more accurate predictions about how the global climate is changing. The new technique could also lead to the development of...

e582c8f7f0657bfd50bdc7401a51cd29
2009-12-02 10:22:33

In a striking finding that raises new questions about carbon dioxide's (CO2) impact on marine life, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists report that some shell-building creatures"”such as crabs, shrimp and lobsters"”unexpectedly build more shell when exposed to ocean acidification caused by elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Because excess CO2 dissolves in the ocean"”causing it to "acidify" "”researchers have been concerned about the...

6799cd9334d6b316982a10ce1176f4621
2009-11-19 08:18:19

First year-by-year study, 1765-2008, shows proportion declining The oceans play a key role in regulating climate, absorbing more than a quarter of the carbon dioxide that humans put into the air. Now, the first year-by-year accounting of this mechanism during the industrial era suggests the oceans are struggling to keep up with rising emissions"”a finding with potentially wide implications for future climate. The study appears in this week's issue of the journal Nature, and is expanded...

2009-11-18 15:00:00

International coalition advances marine conservation as part of the solution to climate change WASHINGTON, Nov. 18 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A large international coalition today urged the United States to support marine conservation options that will help mitigate climate change. The 'Blue Climate Coalition,' comprised of sixty-six conservation groups and interests and over 150 marine scientists and professionals, from 33 countries, issued communications today addressed to President...

28dc950048e3784ca97074683d5394cc1
2009-11-16 15:34:30

To have even a chance of saving the world's coral reefs from extensive damage caused by global warming, carbon emissions in industrialized countries need to be cut by 25% below their year 2000 levels by 2020 "“ and by 80-90% by 2050. That is the uncompromising warning delivered today by some of Australia's most eminent marine and environmental scientists in a briefing to Australian Members of Parliament and Senators, in Parliament House, Canberra. "The Great Barrier Reef (GBR)...


Latest Ocean acidification Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

Reef0607
2012-04-03 17:24:13

Rice Coral, (Montipora capitata), also known as Pore Coral, is a species of stony coral in the Acroporidae family. It is found in the tropical north and central areas of the Pacific Ocean at depths down to 66 feet. It is common in the waters near Hawaii, especially where the sea is turbulent. This is a reef-building species that forms colonies. As it matures, it develops tree-like branches. Its corallites are tiny and well separated by a calcareous (calcium carbonate) skeleton. The walls...

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