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Latest Ocean acidification Stories

Tiny Plankton May Have Big Impact On Climate
2013-09-13 14:28:37

European Geosciences Union As the climate changes and oceans' acidity increases, tiny plankton seem set to succeed. An international team of marine scientists has found that the smallest plankton groups thrive under elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) levels. This could cause an imbalance in the food web as well as decrease ocean CO2 uptake, an important regulator of global climate. The results of the study, conducted off the coast of Svalbard, Norway, in 2010, are now compiled in a special...

Receding Ice Exposes Seawater To Carbon Dioxide, Driving Ocean Acidification In The Arctic Ocean
2013-09-13 12:12:21

University of South Florida (USF Health) Acidification of the Arctic Ocean is occurring faster than projected according to new findings published in the journal PLoS One. The increase in rate is being blamed on rapidly melting sea ice, a process that may have important consequences for health of the Arctic ecosystem. Ocean acidification is the process by which pH levels of seawater decrease due to greater amounts of carbon dioxide being absorbed by the oceans from the atmosphere....

X Prize For Measuring Ocean Health
2013-09-10 11:15:29

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Global warming alarmists and deniers alike can probably agree on at least one thing: Scientists need the most accurate data and tools to make their climate assessments. In pursuit of more accurate climate data, the X Prize Foundation has announced a $2-million competition designed to kick-start technology innovations surrounding the accurate measuring of oceanic pH. Climatologists have been warning that the world's oceans are...

Animal Species Ocean Acidification
2013-08-26 09:36:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online When atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolves into the ocean, it forms carbonic acid, which in turn lowers the water's pH levels and causes oceanic acidification. The phenomenon is expected to occur at increasing rates as carbon dioxide emissions around the world continue to rise. In a report published in Nature Climate Change, two researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz-Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) in...

Understanding Marine Life's Ability To Adapt To Climate Change
2013-08-26 06:03:13

University of Plymouth A study into marine life around an underwater volcanic vent in the Mediterranean, might hold the key to understanding how some species will be able to survive in increasingly acidic sea water should anthropogenic climate change continue. Researchers have discovered that some species of polychaete worms are able to modify their metabolic rates to better cope with and thrive in waters high in carbon dioxide (CO2), which is otherwise poisonous to other, often...

2013-08-13 10:10:34

Corals can survive the early stages of their development even under the tough conditions that rising carbon emissions will impose on them says a new study from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. Globally, ocean acidification due to the burning of fossil fuels remains a major concern and scientists say it could have severe consequences for the health of adult corals, however, the evidence for negative effects on the early life stages of corals is less clear cut. Dr...

Coral Reef Protection From Cloud Seeding
2013-07-11 04:51:24

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from the University of Leeds reveals threatened coral reefs could be protected from bleaching by warming oceans. The study proposes a targeted version of the geoengineering technique known as Marine Cloud Brightening (MCB) - seeding the clouds to cool sea surface temperatures - could give coral a fifty year "breathing space" to recover from acidification and warming. "Coral bleaching over the last few decades has been...

Ocean Acidification Has Transformed Delicate Ecosystem
2013-07-09 15:43:58

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While many studies have focused on how ocean acidification may impact various individual species, an international team of researchers has just published a study on how an entire ecosystem can be affected by a more acidic ocean. As one of the consequences of climate change, ocean acidification is expected to significantly increase if carbon emissions continue at current rates. According to the study, which was published in...

Ocean Springs Indicate Coral Response To Acidification
2013-06-18 10:29:16

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The density of coral skeletons will be reduced by ocean acidification due to rising carbon dioxide levels, according to an international group of scientists led by the University of California, Santa Cruz. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, focused on corals growing where submarine springs naturally lower the pH of seawater. The findings of this study are the first to show corals are not able to...

Purple Urchins Quickly Adapt To Acidic Oceans
2013-06-13 11:41:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online As the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide increase, the oceans are projected to absorb more of the greenhouse gas, leading to acidification of the water. This shift in oceanic chemistry is expected to negatively impact countless species. However, a new study from the University of California, Santa Barbara has found that purple sea urchins Strongylocentrotus purpuratus are capable of evolving in a way that copes with potential...


Latest Ocean acidification Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

Reef0607
2012-04-03 17:24:13

Rice Coral, (Montipora capitata), also known as Pore Coral, is a species of stony coral in the Acroporidae family. It is found in the tropical north and central areas of the Pacific Ocean at depths down to 66 feet. It is common in the waters near Hawaii, especially where the sea is turbulent. This is a reef-building species that forms colonies. As it matures, it develops tree-like branches. Its corallites are tiny and well separated by a calcareous (calcium carbonate) skeleton. The walls...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'