Quantcast
Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Latest Ocean acidification Stories

2011-05-13 10:41:24

A new set of buoys in Alaska waters will help scientists understand how climate change may be affecting the pH level of northern seas. Researchers placed the first buoy last month. "This is the first dedicated ocean acidification mooring to be deployed in a high latitude coastal sea," said Jeremy Mathis, principal investigator for the project and an assistant professor of chemical oceanography at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. "Other moorings have been deployed with ocean acidification...

2011-05-10 16:02:52

The acidification of the world's oceans could have major consequences for the marine environment. New research shows that coccoliths, which are an important part of the marine environment, dissolve when seawater acidifies. Associate Professor Tue Hassenkam and colleagues at the Nano-Science Center, University of Copenhagen, are the first to have measured how individual coccoliths react to water with different degrees of acidity. Coccoliths are very small shells of calcium carbonate that...

2011-04-21 00:00:28

Craig Scott Goldsmith, author of "Uninhabitable: A Case for Caution," says, "It is time for America to step up or step aside." (PRWEB) April 20, 2011 In preparation for Earth Day 2011, Craig Scott Goldsmith, author of "Uninhabitable: A Case for Caution," has sent an open letter to humanity and its leaders cautioning the detrimental effects of releasing Co2 into the atmosphere. Goldsmith says humans are accelerating Co2 emissions through overpopulation, the use of automobiles and by...

9ddde2235a22939fc772626c9d49e8951
2011-04-08 09:42:28

University of Miami scientists using the geologic record of corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate changeClimate change is already widely recognized to be negatively affecting coral reef ecosystems around the world, yet the long-term effects are difficult to predict. University of Miami (UM) scientists are using the geologic record of Caribbean corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate change expected for this century. The findings are...

6221e47881f7ab4d8d38ee368e1d3152
2011-04-04 20:51:58

Microscopic remains of dead Phantom midge larvae (Chaoborus spp.) may explain a few hundred years of history of the living conditions of fish, acidification and fish death in Swedish lakes. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have developed a method of using lake-bottom sediments to show when and how fish life disappeared from acidified lakes "“ invaluable knowledge for lake restorations in acidified regions."It is actually just like a journey through time. Fish hardly...

fb0c41f7c1eea829ad669ae9de2fce97
2011-04-01 08:15:28

A team of scientists in the United Kingdom and the United States has warned that the native fauna and unique ecology of the Southern Ocean, the vast body of water that surrounds the Antarctic continent, is under threat from human activity. Their study is published this week in the peer-reviewed journal Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. "Although  Antarctica is still the most pristine environment on Earth, its marine ecosystems are being degraded through the introduction of...

56b9293463c6c936a29f39ba7f7282891
2011-03-20 06:44:28

Research can help assess impacts of climate change, other threats to coral reef ecosystems University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science scientist Chris Langdon and colleagues developed a new tool to monitor coral reef vital signs. By accurately measuring their biological pulse, scientists can better assess how climate change and other ecological threats impact coral reef health worldwide. During a March 2009 experiment at Cayo Enrique Reef in Puerto Rico, the...

5948c274546206173815c3944969fbfe1
2011-03-17 10:19:55

Scripps researchers document the history of sudden global warming events, impacts on marine life Bursts of intense global warming that have lasted tens of thousands of years have taken place more frequently throughout history than previously believe, according to evidence gathered by a team led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego researchers. Richard Norris, a professor of geology at Scripps who co-authored the report, said that releases of carbon dioxide sequestered in the...

8acb4bd5e5fffbb8899186a5c5b52a321
2011-02-24 09:10:00

Warming seas, rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and other factors such as over-fishing could wipe out the world's coral reefs by 2050 unless urgent action is taken to counteract these threats, environmental advocates warned on Wednesday. More than three quarters of all reefs are currently threatened, said advocates from U.S. government and non-governmental organizations while releasing the report entitled, "Reefs at Risk Revisited." Swift action must be taken to protect these...

1e541c8ddbe28a46076b84edebbc53ae1
2011-02-23 10:56:19

An international research team, with Spanish participation, has discovered a new species of mollusk, Polyconites hadriani, in various parts of the Iberian Peninsula. The researchers say this species, which is the oldest in its genus, adapted to the acidification of the oceans that took place while it was in existence. This process could now determine the evolution of modern marine systems. The new species Polyconites hadriani, which was discovered in 2007, has been crowned the oldest in the...


Latest Ocean acidification Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

Reef0607
2012-04-03 17:24:13

Rice Coral, (Montipora capitata), also known as Pore Coral, is a species of stony coral in the Acroporidae family. It is found in the tropical north and central areas of the Pacific Ocean at depths down to 66 feet. It is common in the waters near Hawaii, especially where the sea is turbulent. This is a reef-building species that forms colonies. As it matures, it develops tree-like branches. Its corallites are tiny and well separated by a calcareous (calcium carbonate) skeleton. The walls...

More Articles (2 articles) »