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Latest Ocean acidification Stories

71e49f4d3dad8c2caf91647e28f5a9cd
2011-06-21 06:20:00

The world's oceans are declining much faster than previously believed, a consortium of ocean experts warned on Monday. Ocean life is "at high risk of entering a phase of extinction of marine species unprecedented in human history," the scientists said in their report, blaming the problem on pollution, overfishing and other man-made causes that are acting simultaneously in ways not seen before. The panel of 27 of the world's top ocean experts said these conditions are pushing the oceans to the...

bd324bbb3fb64d9a4a6b2203365937e2
2011-06-08 09:40:00

UN marks World Oceans Day with calls to preserve seas for future generations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today called on all governments and peoples to play their part to ensure that the world's oceans are protected for future generations, warning that they face major threats in the years ahead. In a statement issued to mark World Oceans Day, which is being celebrated around the globe today, Mr. Ban outlined what he called "many severe challenges related to oceans." "These range from...

2011-06-06 19:42:47

The rate of release of carbon into the atmosphere today is nearly 10 times as fast as during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), 55.9 million years ago, the best analog we have for current global warming, according to an international team of geologists. Rate matters and this current rapid change may not allow sufficient time for the biological environment to adjust. "We looked at the PETM because it is thought to be the best ancient analog for future climate change caused by fossil...

209fc346ac86492420665d59e3130295
2011-06-01 09:55:33

Since the Industrial Revolution, over half of all the CO2 produced by burning fossil fuels has been absorbed by the ocean, making pH drop faster than any time in the last 650,000 years and resulting in ocean acidification. Recent studies have shown that this causes fish to lose their sense of smell, but a new study published May 31 in Biology Letters shows that fish hearing is also compromised. Working with Professor Philip Munday at James Cook University, lead author Dr Steve Simpson of the...

4ab4c66059fb88f399a3d1db70e78e75
2011-05-30 12:46:25

According to new findings, seas off Papua New Guinea suggest that acidifying oceans will severely hit coral reefs by the end of the century. Carbon dioxide bubbles into the water from the slopes of a dormant volcano there, making it more acidic. Coral is badly affected and not growing at all in the CO2-rich zone. The scientists say this "lab" mimics conditions that will be widespread if CO2 emissions continue. The oceans absorb some of the carbon dioxide that human activities are putting...

2011-05-26 21:23:37

Coastal communities hard hit by ocean acidification hotspots have more options than they may realize, says an interdisciplinary team of science and legal experts. In a paper published in the journal Science, experts from Stanford University's Center for Ocean Solutions and colleagues make the case that communities don't need to wait for a global solution to ocean acidification to fix a local problem that is compromising their marine environment. Many localized acidification hotspots can be...

2011-05-13 10:41:24

A new set of buoys in Alaska waters will help scientists understand how climate change may be affecting the pH level of northern seas. Researchers placed the first buoy last month. "This is the first dedicated ocean acidification mooring to be deployed in a high latitude coastal sea," said Jeremy Mathis, principal investigator for the project and an assistant professor of chemical oceanography at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. "Other moorings have been deployed with ocean acidification...

2011-05-10 16:02:52

The acidification of the world's oceans could have major consequences for the marine environment. New research shows that coccoliths, which are an important part of the marine environment, dissolve when seawater acidifies. Associate Professor Tue Hassenkam and colleagues at the Nano-Science Center, University of Copenhagen, are the first to have measured how individual coccoliths react to water with different degrees of acidity. Coccoliths are very small shells of calcium carbonate that...

2011-04-21 00:00:28

Craig Scott Goldsmith, author of "Uninhabitable: A Case for Caution," says, "It is time for America to step up or step aside." (PRWEB) April 20, 2011 In preparation for Earth Day 2011, Craig Scott Goldsmith, author of "Uninhabitable: A Case for Caution," has sent an open letter to humanity and its leaders cautioning the detrimental effects of releasing Co2 into the atmosphere. Goldsmith says humans are accelerating Co2 emissions through overpopulation, the use of automobiles and by...

9ddde2235a22939fc772626c9d49e8951
2011-04-08 09:42:28

University of Miami scientists using the geologic record of corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate changeClimate change is already widely recognized to be negatively affecting coral reef ecosystems around the world, yet the long-term effects are difficult to predict. University of Miami (UM) scientists are using the geologic record of Caribbean corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate change expected for this century. The findings are...


Latest Ocean acidification Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

Reef0607
2012-04-03 17:24:13

Rice Coral, (Montipora capitata), also known as Pore Coral, is a species of stony coral in the Acroporidae family. It is found in the tropical north and central areas of the Pacific Ocean at depths down to 66 feet. It is common in the waters near Hawaii, especially where the sea is turbulent. This is a reef-building species that forms colonies. As it matures, it develops tree-like branches. Its corallites are tiny and well separated by a calcareous (calcium carbonate) skeleton. The walls...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.