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Latest Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Stories

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2008-09-30 08:10:00

Technology developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has helped boost the military's accuracy of airdrops by up to 70 percent. Wind directions and speeds are often tough to determine, and can easily blow cargo, vehicles and paratroopers away from their intended targets. This can be a particular problem in mountainous terrain such as Afghanistan. In response, the Defense Department looked to NOAA for help in developing its program to improve wind forecasts....

2008-09-25 12:00:25

CSC, a provider of IT services, has announced that it is part of a team led by Diversified Global Partners that has been awarded a contract to develop and maintain the Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System, a secure environmental data storage and distribution system, for the US Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Under the terms of the agreement, CSC will process and store critical environmental and climate data, and make it available to the...

2008-09-09 12:00:16

The U.S. Department of Energy announced it will make available more than 10 million hours of computing time to study advanced climate change models. The department's Office of Science will allocate the computer time to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to explore advanced climate change models at three of the department's national laboratories. The project is part of a three-year agreement on collaborative climate research that was signed Monday by the two agencies. NOAA...

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2008-04-07 15:05:00

NOAA scientists are now flying through springtime Arctic pollution to find out why the region is warming "” and summertime sea ice is melting "” faster than predicted. Some 35 NOAA researchers are gathering with government and university colleagues in Fairbanks, Alaska, to conduct the study through April 23."The Arctic is changing before our eyes," said A.R. Ravishankara, director of the chemistry division at NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory in Boulder, Colo. "Capturing in...

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2007-04-17 18:55:00

WASHINGTON -- The debate over whether global warming affects hurricanes may be running into some unexpected turbulence. Many researchers believe warming is causing the storms to get stronger, while others aren't so sure. Now, a new study raises the possibility that global warming might even make it harder for hurricanes to form. The findings, by Gabriel A. Vecchi of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Brian J. Soden of the University of Miami, are reported in Wednesday's...

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2006-02-28 08:28:29

HONOLULU -- Ocean scientists are enlisting cargo and cruise ships to measure water temperatures, ocean currents and even the height of clouds as the vessels ply their regular routes, in a program that they hope will help reveal some of the oceans' secrets. "They're going to change our view over the next few years of the way the ocean actually looks," said Peter Ortner, chief scientist with the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

2006-02-02 14:12:02

By Christopher Doering WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The return of a La Nina weather pattern this year will likely mean drought in southern and southwestern U.S. states, government forecasters said on Thursday, adding it was too early to tell if La Nina would also lead to more Atlantic hurricanes in 2006. La Nina is an unusual cooling of Pacific Ocean surface temperatures, which can trigger widespread changes in weather around the world. Forecasters with the National Oceanic and...

2006-02-02 14:10:03

By Christopher Doering WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The return of a La Nina weather pattern this year will likely mean drought in southern and southwestern U.S. states, government forecasters said on Thursday, adding it was too early to tell if La Nina would also lead to more Atlantic hurricanes in 2006. La Nina is an unusual cooling of Pacific Ocean surface temperatures, which can trigger widespread changes in weather around the world. Forecasters with the National Oceanic and...

2006-01-12 14:44:28

WASHINGTON (AP) - A La Nina, a mild cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean which can affect weather in other areas, is being forecast for spring. La Ninas tend to encourage wet weather in the Pacific Northwest and dry conditions in the south, but National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration forecasters declined to blame current weather on the phenomena. La Nina is the opposite of the better known El Nino, a Pacific warming. Both occur every few years and can affect weather around the...

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2005-07-21 17:24:05

NASA -- Researchers from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and several other government and academic institutions have created four new supercomputer simulations that for the first time combine their mathematical computer models of the atmosphere, ocean, land surface and sea ice. These simulations are the first field tests of the new Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF), an innovative software system that promises to improve and accelerate U.S. predictive capability ranging from...


Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.