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Latest Ohio State University Stories

2010-05-13 07:46:14

Moderate to severely depressed clients showed greater improvement in cognitive therapy when therapists emphasized changing how they think rather than how they behave, new research has found. The results suggest cognitive therapists should concentrate, at least during the first few sessions, on using cognitive techniques to help those with more severe depression to break out of negative thought patterns and to see events in their lives more realistically. The study found that a concentration...

2010-05-10 15:47:18

Scientists have used quantum mechanics to reveal that the most common mineral on Earth is relatively uncommon deep within the planet. Using several of the largest supercomputers in the nation, a team of physicists led by Ohio State University has been able to simulate the behavior of silica in a high-temperature, high-pressure form that is particularly difficult to study firsthand in the lab. The resulting discovery -- reported in this week's early online edition of the Proceedings of the...

2010-05-10 15:40:00

A tiny gene mutation in human liver cells could one day influence how high or low a dose patients need of about half of the clinically used drugs on the market, new research suggests. Scientists at Ohio State University and their colleagues have identified this mutation, and have shown that it alters the level of a protein in the liver responsible for processing between 45 percent and 60 percent of medications used to treat a wide range of conditions. Each gene contains two alternative forms...

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2010-05-07 11:10:00

When it comes to talking to parents about most dating issues, teen girls tend to disclose more than boys, and both sexes generally prefer to talk to their mothers. However, a new study found that girls and boys are equally close-mouthed about issues involving sex and what they do with their dates while unsupervised. And in this case, teens were no more eager to talk to their mothers than they were their fathers. Results showed that the amount of information parents hear from their teenagers...

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2010-05-05 11:15:00

The decline in the generosity of Social Security benefits for workers who recently reached their 60s has been the leading cause of the trend toward delayed retirement of older men, a new national study suggests. Between the periods of 1988-1992 and 2001-2005, there was a 4.7 percentage point increase in the number of men aged 55 to 69 in the workforce. The new study found that between 25 and 50 percent of that increase can be explained by declining Social Security benefits, said David Blau,...

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2010-05-03 11:31:00

New research suggests that Charles Darwin's family was a living human example of a theory that he developed about plants: that inbreeding could negatively affect the health and number of resulting offspring. Darwin was married to his first cousin, Emma Wedgwood. They had 10 children, but three died before age 10, two from infectious diseases. And three of the six surviving children with long-term marriages did not produce any offspring "“ a "suspicious" sign, researchers say, that these...

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2010-04-26 14:02:36

Disadvantaged urban preschoolers aren't only at risk for failure in the classroom "“ they are likely to struggle on playgrounds and athletic fields as well, research suggests. A new study found that more than eight out of every ten disadvantaged preschoolers from two urban areas showed significant developmental delays in basic motor skills such as running, jumping, throwing, and catching. That means that they are at risk of giving up on physical activities and becoming obese teenagers...

2010-04-26 07:51:49

Scientists have combined chemistry and biology research techniques to explain how certain bacteria grow structures on their surfaces that allow them to simultaneously cause illness and protect themselves from the body's defenses. The researchers are the first to reproduce a specific component of this natural process in a test tube "“ an essential step to fully understanding how these structures grow. With the new method described, these and other researchers now can delve even deeper...

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2010-04-13 17:25:00

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- As the Internet spreads across the globe, countries don't necessarily need democracy to join the online community, a new study from Ohio State University has found. Rather, social factors such as population growth and violent conflict are much more important -- and capitalism trumps them all. In a recent issue of the journal Sociological Inquiry, researchers report their 12-year study of the social and economic barriers that prevent some countries from crossing the "digital...

2010-04-12 14:19:56

Most women scheduled for gynecologic surgery to address noncancerous symptoms said in a recently published survey that they were not worried about the effects of the procedure on their sex lives. However, a surprising 37 percent of women planning to be sterilized did express concern in this study that they might have less sexual desire after the operation "“ even though that surgery does not affect hormone levels. Among those in the study who were having reproductive organs surgically...


Latest Ohio State University Reference Libraries

Nancy Currie
2012-08-17 14:31:26

Nancy Currie is an engineer, United States Army officer, and a NASA astronaut. She was born Nancy Jane Sherlock on December 29, 1958 in Wilmington, Delaware. She moved to Troy, Ohio as a child and graduated from Troy High School in 1977. She then went on to attend Ohio State University where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biological Science in 1980. From there she continued her education by earning a Master of Science degree in Safety Engineering from the University of Southern...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.