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Latest Ohio State University Stories

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2010-03-24 15:55:00

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- An Ohio State University study of 100 teen bloggers from around the United States found that the vast majority use blogs to nurture relationships with their peers and build a sense of community -- rather than to admit misbehavior. This preliminary study suggests that blogging could be used therapeutically to help troubled teens express themselves in positive ways, said Dawn Anderson-Butcher, associate professor of social work at Ohio State. She and her students examined blog...

2010-03-15 15:27:31

COLUMBUS, Ohio "“ An experimental oral drug has lowered blood sugar levels and inflammation in mice with Type 2 diabetes, suggesting that the medication could someday be added to the arsenal of drugs used by millions of Americans with this disease, according to new research. The drug consists of a synthetic molecule that stops the biological activity of a protein called macrophage migration inhibitory factor, or MIF. This protein is implicated in a number of diseases because it is...

ca651028970cdba217c7e283df421edd1
2010-03-15 14:10:00

Be true to yourself, and better romantic relationships will follow, research suggests. A new study examined how dating relationships were affected by the ability of people to see themselves clearly and objectively, act in ways consistent with their beliefs, and interact honestly and truthfully with others. In other words, the ability to follow the words of William Shakespeare: "to thine own self be true," said Amy Brunell, lead author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Ohio...

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2010-03-08 14:14:21

The massive magnitude 8.8 earthquake that struck the west coast of Chile last month moved the entire city of Concepcion at least 10 feet to the west, and shifted other parts of South America as far apart as the Falkland Islands and Fortaleza, Brazil. These preliminary measurements, produced from data gathered by researchers from four universities and several agencies, including geophysicists on the ground in Chile, paint a much clearer picture of the power behind this temblor, believed to be...

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2010-03-01 14:55:05

If the behavior of the seasonal form of the H1N1 influenza virus is any indication, scientists say that chances are good that most strains of the pandemic H1N1 flu virus will become resistant to Tamiflu, the main drug stockpiled for use against it. Researchers at Ohio State University have traced the evolutionary history of the seasonal H1N1 influenza virus, which first infected humans during the 1918 pandemic. It is one of three seasonal influenza A viruses that commonly infect humans. The...

2010-03-01 07:48:29

Reversing a protein deficiency through gene therapy can correct motor function, restore nerve signals and improve survival in mice that serve as a model for the lethal childhood disorder spinal muscular atrophy, new research shows. This muscle-wasting disease results when a child's motor neurons "“ nerve cells that send signals from the spinal cord to muscles "“ produce insufficient amounts of what is called survival motor neuron protein, or SMN. This reduced protein in motor...

2010-02-22 16:33:38

COLUMBUS, Ohio "“ A new study suggests that the bacteria that cause typhoid fever collect in tiny but persistent communities on gallstones, making the infection particularly hard to fight in so-called "carriers" "“ people who have the disease but show no symptoms. Humans who harbor these bacterial communities in their gallbladders, even without symptoms, are able to infect others with active typhoid fever, especially in developing areas of the world with poor sanitation. The...

2010-02-19 10:27:21

Highly fit multiple sclerosis patients perform significantly better on tests of cognitive function than similar less-fit patients, a new study shows. In addition, MRI scans of the patients showed that the fitter MS patients showed less damage in parts of the brain that show deterioration as a result of MS, as well as a greater volume of vital gray matter. "We found that aerobic fitness has a protective effect on parts of the brain that are most affected by multiple sclerosis," said Ruchika...

2010-02-17 06:45:00

REDONDO BEACH, Calif., Feb. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- 1954 small-town Ohio may seem a simpler, easier time: Before Vietnam, civil rights and women's movements, before Washington controversies, the buying of America, and the loss, perhaps, of our collective innocence. But as George T. Lindsey's novel "Clay Town, 1954" (published by Trafford Publishing) shows, the struggles with conflicts of duty and desire in 1954 are not simpler. The inhabitants of that place and time battle enigmas and...

2010-02-10 11:31:51

In the first large-scale epidemiological study of elevator-related injuries in older adults in the United States, researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine and an Ohio State University colleague report in the January 2010 issue of The Journal of Trauma Injury, Infection, and Critical Care on the frequency, nature and opportunities for prevention of these injuries. Nearly 120 billion riders enter an estimated 750,000 elevators annually in the U.S. Older adults are more likely...


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Nancy Currie
2012-08-17 14:31:26

Nancy Currie is an engineer, United States Army officer, and a NASA astronaut. She was born Nancy Jane Sherlock on December 29, 1958 in Wilmington, Delaware. She moved to Troy, Ohio as a child and graduated from Troy High School in 1977. She then went on to attend Ohio State University where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biological Science in 1980. From there she continued her education by earning a Master of Science degree in Safety Engineering from the University of Southern...

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