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Latest Ohio State University Stories

2010-03-01 07:48:29

Reversing a protein deficiency through gene therapy can correct motor function, restore nerve signals and improve survival in mice that serve as a model for the lethal childhood disorder spinal muscular atrophy, new research shows. This muscle-wasting disease results when a child's motor neurons "“ nerve cells that send signals from the spinal cord to muscles "“ produce insufficient amounts of what is called survival motor neuron protein, or SMN. This reduced protein in motor...

2010-02-22 16:33:38

COLUMBUS, Ohio "“ A new study suggests that the bacteria that cause typhoid fever collect in tiny but persistent communities on gallstones, making the infection particularly hard to fight in so-called "carriers" "“ people who have the disease but show no symptoms. Humans who harbor these bacterial communities in their gallbladders, even without symptoms, are able to infect others with active typhoid fever, especially in developing areas of the world with poor sanitation. The...

2010-02-19 10:27:21

Highly fit multiple sclerosis patients perform significantly better on tests of cognitive function than similar less-fit patients, a new study shows. In addition, MRI scans of the patients showed that the fitter MS patients showed less damage in parts of the brain that show deterioration as a result of MS, as well as a greater volume of vital gray matter. "We found that aerobic fitness has a protective effect on parts of the brain that are most affected by multiple sclerosis," said Ruchika...

2010-02-17 06:45:00

REDONDO BEACH, Calif., Feb. 17 /PRNewswire/ -- 1954 small-town Ohio may seem a simpler, easier time: Before Vietnam, civil rights and women's movements, before Washington controversies, the buying of America, and the loss, perhaps, of our collective innocence. But as George T. Lindsey's novel "Clay Town, 1954" (published by Trafford Publishing) shows, the struggles with conflicts of duty and desire in 1954 are not simpler. The inhabitants of that place and time battle enigmas and...

2010-02-10 11:31:51

In the first large-scale epidemiological study of elevator-related injuries in older adults in the United States, researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine and an Ohio State University colleague report in the January 2010 issue of The Journal of Trauma Injury, Infection, and Critical Care on the frequency, nature and opportunities for prevention of these injuries. Nearly 120 billion riders enter an estimated 750,000 elevators annually in the U.S. Older adults are more likely...

2010-02-09 16:21:06

A fictional television drama may be more effective in persuading young women to use birth control than a news-format program on the same issue, according to a new study. Researchers found that college-age women who viewed a televised drama about a teen pregnancy felt more vulnerable two weeks after watching the show, and this led to more support for using birth control. However, those who watched a news program detailing the difficulties caused by teen pregnancies were unmoved, and had no...

2010-01-28 15:03:04

Scientists have determined how a normal protein can be converted into a prion, an infectious agent that causes fatal brain diseases in humans and mammals. The finding, in mice, is expected to advance the understanding of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or TSEs, a family of neurodegenerative diseases that include Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, kuru and fatal familial insomnia in humans, scrapie in sheep, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, also known as "mad cow disease."...

2010-01-25 14:54:11

Scientists have automated the measurement of a vital part of the knee in images with a computer program that performs much faster and just as reliably as humans who interpret the same images. Having more precise information about wear and tear on this portion of the knee "“ a blend of fibrous tissue and cartilage called the meniscus "“ could lead to its use as a biomarker in predicting who is at risk for developing osteoarthritis, researchers say. The meniscus consists of two...

2010-01-11 13:40:06

Regularly practicing yoga exercises may lower a number of compounds in the blood and reduce the level of inflammation that normally rises because of both normal aging and stress, a new study has shown. The study, done by Ohio State University researchers and just reported in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine, showed that women who routinely practiced yoga had lower amounts of the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in their blood. The women also showed smaller increases in IL-6 after stressful...

2010-01-11 13:31:45

While genetics play a key role in children's initial reading skills, a new study of twins is the first to demonstrate that environment plays an important role in reading growth over time. The results give further evidence that children can make  gains in reading during their early school years, above and beyond the important genetic factors that influence differences in reading, said Stephen Petrill, lead author of the study and professor of human development and family science at Ohio...


Latest Ohio State University Reference Libraries

Nancy Currie
2012-08-17 14:31:26

Nancy Currie is an engineer, United States Army officer, and a NASA astronaut. She was born Nancy Jane Sherlock on December 29, 1958 in Wilmington, Delaware. She moved to Troy, Ohio as a child and graduated from Troy High School in 1977. She then went on to attend Ohio State University where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biological Science in 1980. From there she continued her education by earning a Master of Science degree in Safety Engineering from the University of Southern...

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Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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