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Latest Ohio State University Stories

2012-12-18 11:10:59

A desire for expensive, high-status goods is related to feelings of social status - which helps explain why minorities are attracted to bling, a new study suggests. Previous research had shown that racial minorities spend a larger portion of their incomes than do whites on conspicuous consumption — buying products that suggest high status. But a new study showed that whites could be induced to crave expensive, high-status products if they imagined themselves in a low-status...

2012-12-13 12:31:34

A new study of the batteries commonly used in hybrid and electric-only cars has revealed an unexpected factor that could limit the performance of batteries currently on the road. Researchers led by Ohio State University engineers examined used car batteries and discovered that over time lithium accumulates beyond the battery electrodes — in the “current collector,” a sheet of copper which facilitates electron transfer between the electrodes and the car´s electrical...

Very Large Array Detected Two US Underground Nuclear Tests
2012-12-06 07:31:52

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists searching for rogue nukes have discovered an unlikely tool, astronomical radio telescopes. When they demonstrated that South Korean GPS stations detected telltale atmospheric disturbances from North Korea's 2009 nuclear test, a research team from Ohio State University discovered another unlikely tool. The discovery that underground nuclear explosions leave their mark on the outer reaches of Earth's atmosphere led to the...

Other Solar Systems More Habitable Than Ours
2012-12-04 05:14:58

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study has found that many planets in other solar systems may be more habitable than our very own. Astronomers and geologists at Ohio State University teamed up to search for alien life in a whole new way; by studying eight "solar twins" of our sun in order to measure the amounts of radioactive elements they contain. Those stars came from a dataset recorded by the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS)...

2012-11-30 14:21:20

Bacteria that cause the tick-borne disease anaplasmosis in humans create their own food supply by hijacking a process in host cells that normally should help kill the pathogenic bugs, scientists have found. This bacterium, Anaplasma phagocytophilum (Ap), secretes a protein that can start this process. The protein binds with another protein produced by white blood cells, and that connection creates compartments that siphon host-cell nutrients to feed the bacteria, enabling their growth...

Global Warming 250 Million Years Ago Triggered Slow Species Recovery
2012-11-05 12:49:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online After a major extinction event occurred 250 million years ago, many species that survived had a long, slow recovery, which was exacerbated by the effects of global warming, according to a new study presented at the Geological Society of America meeting in North Carolina this week. Ohio State University doctoral student Alexa Sedlacek, in his study, found that rising temperatures, high levels of greenhouse gases and a more acidic ocean,...

2012-10-15 16:35:50

Companionship has the potential to reduce pain linked to nerve damage, according to a new study. Mice that were paired with a cage-mate showed lower pain responses and fewer signs of inflammation in their nervous system after undergoing surgery that affected their nerves than did isolated mice, suggesting that the social contact had both behavioral and physiological influences. The social contact lowered the pain response and signs of inflammation even in animals that had experienced...

2012-10-15 11:21:45

A new study in animals shows that chronic stress during pregnancy prevents brain benefits of motherhood, a finding that researchers suggest could increase understanding of postpartum depression. Rat mothers showed an increase in brain cell connections in regions associated with learning, memory and mood. In contrast, the brains of mother rats that were stressed twice a day throughout pregnancy did not show this increase. The researchers were specifically interested in dendritic spines...

2012-10-09 22:23:05

Keeping the lungs healthy could be an important way to retain thinking functions that relate to problem-solving and processing speed in one´s later years, new research suggests. While these two types of “fluid” cognitive functions were influenced by reduced pulmonary function, a drop in lung health did not appear to impair memory or lead to any significant loss of stored knowledge, the study showed. Researchers used data from a Swedish study of aging that tracked...

2012-10-03 09:58:22

Transportation practices tend to be more environmentally friendly in wealthier metropolitan areas located within states that mandate comprehensive planning, new research suggests. The study involved an examination of 225 U.S. metropolitan areas between 1980 and 2008 to gauge how sustainable their transportation practices were and determine what kinds of socioeconomic factors appeared to influence those practices. Overall, transportation has become less sustainable across the country...


Latest Ohio State University Reference Libraries

Nancy Currie
2012-08-17 14:31:26

Nancy Currie is an engineer, United States Army officer, and a NASA astronaut. She was born Nancy Jane Sherlock on December 29, 1958 in Wilmington, Delaware. She moved to Troy, Ohio as a child and graduated from Troy High School in 1977. She then went on to attend Ohio State University where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biological Science in 1980. From there she continued her education by earning a Master of Science degree in Safety Engineering from the University of Southern...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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