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Latest Ohio State University Stories

2012-06-04 19:36:53

Skin cancer patients whose childhood included periods of neglect or maltreatment are at a much greater risk for their cancers to return when they face a major stressful event, based on a new study. The research suggests that such experiences during a person's youth can set a lower level of immune response for life, which in turn might make them more susceptible to the kind of cancers that are often successfully fought by the immune system, so-called immunogenic tumors. While the...

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2012-06-04 12:03:52

Many first-time parents - particularly mothers - actually increase the amount of time they spend on Facebook after the birth of their child according to a small exploratory study. The results shown 44% of mothers said after giving birth their facebook use increased. 27% said it decreased while 29% said their use stayed the same. For the fathers, 31% said their use increased, 19% said it decreased and 51% said it stayed the same. This study is the first to investigate new...

2012-05-15 21:10:57

For the first time, researchers have been able to combine different climate models using spatial statistics - to project future seasonal temperature changes in regions across North America. They performed advanced statistical analysis on two different North American regional climate models and were able to estimate projections of temperature changes for the years 2041 to 2070, as well as the certainty of those projections. The analysis, developed by statisticians at Ohio State...

“Losing Yourself” In a Fictional Character Can Affect Your Real Life
2012-05-07 14:26:49

When you “lose yourself” inside the world of a fictional character while reading a story, you may actually end up changing your own behavior and thoughts to match that of the character, a new study suggests. Researchers at Ohio State University examined what happened to people who, while reading a fictional story, found themselves feeling the emotions, thoughts, beliefs and internal responses of one of the characters as if they were their own - a phenomenon the researchers call...

2012-05-01 21:26:28

A national study suggests that a significantly greater number of highly educated women in their late 30s and 40s are deciding to have children - a dramatic turnaround from recent history. Among college-educated women, childlessness peaked in the late 1990s, when about 30 percent had no children, according to the new analysis of U.S. data. But childlessness declined about 5 percentage points between 1998 and 2008. “We may be seeing the beginning of a new trend,” said Bruce...

Potential Dark Side To Diets High In Beta-Carotene
2012-05-01 12:08:08

New research suggests that there could be health hazards associated with consuming excessive amounts of beta-carotene . This antioxidant is a naturally occurring pigment that gives color to foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes and certain greens. It also converts to vitamin A, and foods and supplements are the only sources for this essential nutrient. But scientists at Ohio State University have found that certain molecules that derive from beta-carotene have an opposite effect in the...

2012-04-30 15:38:50

People aren´t very good at media multitasking - like reading a book while watching TV - but do it anyway because it makes them feel good, a new study suggests. The findings provide clues as to why multitasking is so popular, even though many studies show it is not productive. Researchers had college students record all of their media use and other activities for 28 days, including why they used various media sources and what they got out of it. The findings showed that...

2012-04-30 15:33:03

Just 20 minutes of playing a violent shooting video game made players more accurate when firing a realistic gun at a mannequin - and more likely to aim for and hit the head, a new study found. Players who used a pistol-shaped controller in a shooting video game with human targets had 99 percent more completed head shots to the mannequin than did participants who played other video games, as well as 33 percent more shots that hit other parts of the body. In addition, the study found that...


Latest Ohio State University Reference Libraries

Nancy Currie
2012-08-17 14:31:26

Nancy Currie is an engineer, United States Army officer, and a NASA astronaut. She was born Nancy Jane Sherlock on December 29, 1958 in Wilmington, Delaware. She moved to Troy, Ohio as a child and graduated from Troy High School in 1977. She then went on to attend Ohio State University where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Biological Science in 1980. From there she continued her education by earning a Master of Science degree in Safety Engineering from the University of Southern...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.