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Old World vultures Reference Libraries

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Greater Yellow-Headed Vulture Cathartes melambrotus
2013-01-02 11:44:29

The Greater Yellow-Headed Vulture (cathartes melambrotus) is also known as the Forest Vulture, it is a species of bird in the New World Vulture family Cathartidae. It was considered to be the same species as the Lesser Yellow-Headed Vulture until they were split in 1964. It is found in South America in tropical moist lowland forest. It is a fairly large bird, with a wingspan of 65 to 70 inches,...

Lappet-faced Vulture
2006-03-01 10:53:36

The Lappet-faced Vulture or Nubian Vulture (Torgos tracheliotus) is an African Old World vulture belonging to the bird order Accipitriformes. It is the only member of the genus Torgos. A distinct subspecies, T. t. negevensis, occurs in the Sinia, the Negev desert and possibly in north-west Saudi Arabia. It is about 1.15 meters long, with a wingspan of 3 meters. The average weight is 14...

Red-headed Vulture
2006-03-01 10:50:03

The Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus) also known as the King Vulture or the Pondicherry Vulture, is a species of Old World vulture found in South Asia.

Hooded Vulture
2006-03-01 10:20:22

The Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus) is an Old World vulture in the order Accipitriformes. It is the only member of the genus Necrosyrtes. It often moves in flocks and is very abundant. In much of its range, there are always several visible soaring in the sky at almost any time during the day. This mostly resident species can be found throughout much of Africa south of the Sahara. They...

Cape Vulture
2006-03-01 10:04:48

The Cape Griffon or Cape Vulture (Gyps coprotheres) is an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae. It is common to southern Africa, and is found mainly in South Africa, Lesotho and Botswana. They nest on cliffs and typically lay one egg per year. The species is listed as "Vulnerable", and the IUCN Conservation Status is (VU A1ade+2de, C1+2b). The major problems it faces are poisoning,...

Indian White-rumped Vulture
2006-03-01 09:08:25

The Indian White-rumped Vulture (Gyps bengalensis) is an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae. It is closely related to the European Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus). It breeds on crags or in trees in mountains throughout India and southeast Asia, laying one egg. Birds sometimes form loose colonies. The population is mostly resident. This scavenger feeds mainly from carcasses of dead...

Griffon Vulture
2006-03-01 09:04:18

The Griffon Vulture (Gyps fulvus) is an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae and is resident in mountains throughout southern Europe, north Africa, and Asia. Griffon Vultures have been re-introduced successfully into the Massif Central in France. Griffons may form loose colonies, and will often move in flocks. Like other vultures it is an expert scavenger, feeding mostly from...

Palm-nut Vulture
2006-03-01 08:50:23

The Palm-nut Vulture (Gypohierax angolensis) is a very large bird of prey in the family Accipitridae. It is the only member of the genus Gypohierax. This Old World vulture is not related to the New World vultures which are in a separate family, Cathartidae. It breeds in forest and savannah throughout sub-Saharan Africa, and generally prefers to be near water. Its range coincides with that of...

Old World vulture
2006-03-01 07:34:38

PHOTO CAPTION:Nubian Vulture or Lappet-faced Vulture Old World vultures belong to the family Accipitridae. They are not considered to be related to the superficially similar New World vultures and condors, and do not share that group's good sense of smell. The similarities between the two groups are due to convergent evolution rather than a close relationship. Vultures are scavengers and...

Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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