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Latest Olfactory receptor Stories

african elephants
2014-07-25 02:00:22

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Sense of smell is critical for survival in many mammals. The ability to distinguish different odors, which is important for sniffing out food, avoiding predators, and finding mates, depends on the number and type olfactory receptors found in an organism's genome. In a study published this week in Genome Research, researchers examined the olfactory receptor (OR) repertoire encoded in 13 mammalian species and found that African elephants have the largest number...

food aroma molecules
2014-06-27 04:46:18

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The sense of smell in humans has undergone many permutations as we have traveled through evolutionary time. It was once believed that each successive version of our olfactory ability was weaker than the last. Scientists claimed as our sense of sight became ever greater and required more of our energy, our sense of smell suffered. They cited the gradual reduction of our noses paired with the movement of our eyes closer to the middle of...

2014-04-11 10:16:28

To accommodate a lifetime of scents and aromas, mammals have hundreds of genes that each produce a different odorant receptor. The complex and diverse olfactory system they build remains adaptable, but a new study in the journal Science shows that the system's flexibility, or plasticity, has its limits. Working in mice, Brown University scientists found that the fundamental neural wiring map between the nose and the brain becomes established in a critical period of early development and then...

2014-04-11 10:13:44

Stowers investigators reveal a developmental switch in targeting capacity of olfactory neurons The human nose expresses nearly 400 odorant receptors, which allow us to distinguish a large number of scents. In mice the number of odor receptors is closer to 1000. Each olfactory neuron displays only a single type of receptor and all neurons with the same receptors are connected to the same spot, a glomerulus, in the brain. This convergence, or wiring pattern, is often described as an...

Jumping bristletail Lepismachilis y-signata
2014-03-30 03:00:54

Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology Odorant receptors of recent insects evolved long after insects migrated from water to land. An insect’s sense of smell is vital to its survival. Only if it can trace even tiny amounts of odor molecules is it is able to find food sources, communicate with conspecifics, or avoid enemies. According to scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, many proteins involved in the highly sensitive odor perception of insects emerged...

Human Nose Can Distinguish More Than 1 Trillion Scents
2014-03-21 04:48:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online For decades, experts have claimed that people were capable of detecting 10,000 different odors, but new research appearing in the March 21 edition of Science suggests that the actual number of scents detectable by the human nose is considerably higher. In fact, according to an experiment led by Andreas Keller of the Rockefeller University Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior, human noses and brains are sensitive enough to...

Genetics Play A Large Part In Olfaction
2013-12-14 05:33:05

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online People react differently to the same smells. Something that smells wonderful to you could be offensive to your friend, but why this is so has been a mystery. The answer could lie in your genetic makeup, says a research team from Duke University. Their findings, published in the early online edition of Nature Neuroscience, reveal that a difference at the smallest level of DNA — one amino acid on one gene — determines whether or not...

2013-12-09 14:07:38

We each live in a unique odor world According to Gertrude Stein, "A rose is a rose is a rose," but new research indicates that might not be the case when it comes to the rose's scent. Researchers from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions have found that as much as 30 percent of the large array of human olfactory receptor differs between any two individuals. This substantial variation is in turn reflected by variability in how each person perceives odors. Humans have about...

Smell Processes In Our Brain Better Understood Through Locust Study
2013-11-26 09:53:56

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Environmental stimuli often trigger our sense of smell before we exhibit any other response. Smells trigger neurons in our brains that alert us to take action, but there are often more than one odor in our environments at any given time. Barani Raman, PhD, of the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, wanted to answer the question of how our brain processes multiple odors received...

DEET Alternatives Of The Future
2013-10-03 04:27:36

[ Watch the Video: UC Riverside Research Team Identifies DEET Receptors ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online In research that could lead to the development of a safer alternative to the DEET, scientists from the University of California, Riverside have discovered the olfactory receptors used by insects to sense the repellant. While experts have long known that bugs are repelled by DEET (also known as N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), UC-Riverside associate professor of...


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jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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