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Latest Olingo Stories

Carnivorous Mammal Discovery First In 35 Years For The Americas
2013-08-15 11:30:56

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online For the first time in more than three decades, a new carnivorous mammal species has been discovered in the Western hemisphere, researchers from the Smithsonian Institution announced on Thursday. According to Joseph Stromberg of Smithsonian.com, the creature is a member of the raccoon family known as the olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina), and it is native to the cloud forests of Columbia and Ecuador. Dr. Kristofer Helgen, the...


Latest Olingo Reference Libraries

Olingo
2012-10-30 11:18:04

Olingo The olingo is the common name for the genus Bassaricyon, which contains five species of procyonids. The olingos are native to Central and South America, holding a range that extends from Peru to Nicaragua. These animals prefer a habitat within rainforests at altitudes of up to 6,561 feet. This species resembles the kinkajou physically and has similar habits. However, olingos do not have long tongues or a prehensile tail, and have other physical differences. Although members of this...

Bushy-tailed Olingo, Bassaricyon gabbii
2012-07-18 14:02:24

The bushy-tailed olingo (Bassaricyon gabbii) is a species within the Procyonidae family, which includes raccoons. This species was the first to be described in its genus, and it is considered the only “true” olingo. It is native to Central and South America. Its northern range extends from Nicaragua to Ecuador in the south, and includes Panama, Costa Rica and Colombia in between. It prefers habitats within tropical moist forests at altitudes of up to 6,600. The bushy-tailed olingo holds...

38_2fbcfc43bbc8904401d88cf626e04906
2009-02-16 18:16:45

The Kinkajou (Potos flavus), also known as the Honey Bear, is a species of mammal found in the rainforests of Central and South America. It is the only member of the family genus Potos. It is related to the olingo, ringtail, cacomistle, raccoon, and coati. These animals are sometimes mistaken for ferrets or monkeys, but are not related. The name Honey Bear is derived from the fact that in captivity it will eat honey, however, in the wild it has never been observed to do so. An adult...

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Word of the Day
bellycheer
  • Good cheer; viands.
  • To revel; to feast.
The word 'bellycheer' may come from 'belle cheer', "good cheer".
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