Quantcast

Latest Olympus Mons Stories

Lava Floods Mars Ancient Plains
2014-03-06 09:30:21

ESA Two distinct volcanic eruptions have flooded this area of Daedalia Planum with lava, flowing around an elevated fragment of ancient terrain. The images were acquired by ESA’s Mars Express on 28 November 2013 towards the eastern boundary of the gigantic Tharsis Montes volcanic region, where the largest volcanoes on Mars are found. The lava flows seen in this image come from Arsia Mons, the southernmost volcano in the Tharsis complex, which lies around 1000 km to the northwest of...

Scars Of Mars Early History
2013-10-10 10:35:24

ESA Ripped apart by tectonic forces, Hebes Chasma and its neighboring network of canyons bear the scars of the Red Planet’s early history. ESA’s Mars Express has flown over this region of Mars on numerous occasions, but this new eight-image mosaic reveals Hebes Chasma in full and in greater detail than ever. Hebes Chasma is an enclosed, almost 8 km-deep trough stretching 315 km in an east–west direction and 125 km from north to south at its widest point. It sits about 300 km...

Biggest Volcano On Earth At Bottom Of Pacific Ocean
2013-09-05 16:59:25

[ Watch the Video: Pacific Ocean Home To World's Largest Volcano ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Researchers, led by University of Houston professor William Sager, have been able to confirm the existence of the world’s largest single volcano at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, according to an upcoming report in Nature Geoscience. Called Tamu Massif, the volcano covers an area about the size of the British Isles. Without a similar volcano here on Earth,...

ESA Images Mars Largest Volcano
2013-07-05 12:20:47

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Recently released images from the European Space Agency's (ESA) Mars Express revealed new details of the largest known volcano in our solar system, Olympus Mons. The inactive Martian volcano rises to approximately 22,000 feet above the surrounding plain, which is more than twice the height of Earth's 10,000-foot high Mauna Kea volcano. Like Mauna Kea, Olympus Mons is a shield volcano, with gently sloping sides that extend outward in...

Red Planet Goes Blue: Imagining A Habitable Mars
2013-01-07 07:35:36

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mars has been a planet of interest for as long as humans have been going into space. And space scientists for nearly as long have dreamed of one day being able to walk on the surface of the Martian world. And still, others have dreamed of being able to colonize the planet. However, in its current state, it would be a very inhospitable environment for humans. But what if the Red Planet was a hospitable world? What if there were...

King Of Canyons - Mars Valles Marineris
2012-10-23 05:13:19

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online One of the most awe-inspiring sights on the planet Earth is the Grand Canyon. The Colorado River has cut through 2 billion years of geologic history, carving out a canyon that is 277 miles long and up to 18 miles wide. However, next to Valles Marineris on Mars, the Grand Canyon is a mere scratch in the ground. Valles Marineris stretches over 4000 kilometers in length and is 200 kilometers wide, with a maximum depth of 10 kilometers....

Image 1 - Mars Express Helps Map History Of Martian Volcanic History
2012-04-27 04:03:23

Lee Rannals for RedOrbit.com Mars Express has helped to unveil volcanic history of the Red Planet, providing more insight as to what lies underneath our celestial neighbor. The spacecraft has been floating above Mars, mapping out the planet, for five years, during which it has helped researchers find that lava grew denser over time, and that the thickness of the planet's rigid outer layers varies across the Tharsis region. The measurements were taken while Mars Express was orbiting...

c6b69fbba6ad94fdfec6cc2a469ec7181
2010-08-27 06:55:00

Orcus Patera is an enigmatic elliptical depression near Mars's equator, in the eastern hemisphere of the planet. Located between the volcanoes of Elysium Mons and Olympus Mons, its formation remains a mystery. Often overlooked, this well-defined depression extends approximately 380 km by 140 km in a NNE"“SSW direction. It has a rim that rises up to 1800 m above the surrounding plains, while the floor of the depression lies 400"“600 m below the surroundings.  The term...

2009-03-09 08:29:48

U.S. scientists say the 15-mile-high Olympus Mons volcano on Mars might answer the question of whether that planet ever had, or still has, water. Rice University Assistant Professor Patrick McGovern and Associate Professor Julia Morgan used an algorithm to analyze the volcano's structure. They determined that only the presence of ancient clay sediments could account for the volcano's asymmetric shape -- and the presence of sediment indicates water was, or is, involved. Olympus Mons slopes...

ca9495f6ede0b209e8459a8280dbb4ae1
2009-03-04 11:45:00

Rice study hints at water "“ and life "“ under Olympus Mons The Martian volcano Olympus Mons is about three times the height of Mount Everest, but it's the small details that Rice University professors Patrick McGovern and Julia Morgan are looking at in thinking about whether the Red Planet ever had "“ or still supports "“ life. Using a computer modeling system to figure out how Olympus Mons came to be, McGovern and Morgan reached the surprising conclusion that pockets...


Latest Olympus Mons Reference Libraries

4_727f78b2c4a179c08d8cda1ce8ee07742
2004-10-19 04:45:41

Olympus Mons -- Olympus Mons is the tallest mountain in the solar system, at 25 km. Located on Mars, and officially called by its Latin name Olympus Mons. It is named for the mountain on Earth. Olympus Mons is an apparently extinct shield volcano, the result of highly fluid magma flowing out of volcanic vents over a long period of time, and is much wider than it is tall; the average slope of Olympus Mons' flanks is very gradual. The Hawaiian islands are an example of similar shield...

More Articles (1 articles) »
Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
Related