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Latest Oncogene Stories

2011-12-09 11:36:58

Just as people's bodies and minds can become addicted to substances such as drugs, caffeine, alcohol, their cancers can become addicted to certain genes that insure their continued growth and dominance. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Harvard Medical School have developed ways to exploit the addictions of cancers to kill them without harming normal tissues. A report on their work appears online today in the journal Science. Many cancers are driven by the overexpression of...

2011-10-13 11:48:28

Scientists have uncovered evidence of powerful new genetic networks and demonstrated how it may work to drive cancer and normal development In findings with major implications for the genetics of cancer and human health, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and two other science teams in New York City and Rome have uncovered evidence of powerful new genetic networks and showed how it may work to drive cancer and normal development. Four papers published online...

2011-07-14 08:00:00

LA JOLLA, Calif., July 14, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Regulus Therapeutics Inc., a biopharmaceutical company leading the discovery and development of innovative medicines targeting microRNAs, today announced that it has added Gregory Hannon, Ph.D. to its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). The addition of Dr. Hannon, a researcher whose work has involved the molecular identification and characterization of the microRNA pathway, increases SAB membership to six pioneers in this area of scientific...

2011-07-07 19:23:55

Scripps Research Institute scientists have discovered a basic mechanism that can enable developing cancer cells to sustain abnormal growth. The finding is expected to lead to the targeting of this mechanism with drugs and diagnostic techniques. The study, which recently appeared in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, illuminates the roles of two nearly identical proteins, Cks1 and Cks2. These proteins were known to be overexpressed in many cancers,...

2011-03-15 16:05:36

Jean-Christophe Marine (VIB, K.U.Leuven) strongly argues against the use of Cop1-inhibitory drugs. The protein Cop1 has "“for a long time - been seen as an attractive drug target for cancer. But Jean-Christophe Marine found out that Cop1 acts as a tumor suppressor, and thus inhibits tumor formation. His new data will have direct implications for the development of cancer drug targets. Tumorigenesis: loss of control Tumors form when control over the cell division is lost; a process that...

2011-01-24 15:22:59

Scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) have discovered a rogue gene which "“ if blocked by the right drugs "“ could stop cancer in its tracks. Published today by the journal Oncogene, the discovery is a breakthrough in our understanding of how cancer spreads. It is hoped the research will lead to new drugs that halt the critical late stage of the disease when cancer cells spread to other parts of the body. The culprit gene "“ known as WWP2 - is an enzymic bonding...

2011-01-19 23:48:12

C. elegans model shows how RAS oncogene switching determines a cell's fate The National Cancer Institute estimates that more than 43,000 Americans were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year and more than 36,000 died from the disease. Despite advances in genetic science showing that the Ras oncogene is mutated in virtually all pancreatic cancers, scientists have been frustrated by the complexity of the signaling pathways in humans, which make it difficult to pinpoint potential therapeutic...

2010-12-15 15:40:23

Lost microRNAs put brakes on tumors By determining what goes missing in human cells when the gene that is most commonly mutated in pancreatic cancer gets turned on, Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered a potential strategy for therapy. The production of a particular cluster of genetic snippets known as microRNAs is dramatically reduced in human pancreatic tumor cells compared to healthy tissue, the researchers report in a study published Dec. 15 in Genes and Development. When the team...

2010-11-18 12:41:30

An international, multi-center study has revealed the discovery of a novel oncogene that is associated with uveal melanoma, the most common form of eye cancer. Researchers have isolated an oncogene called GNA11 and have found that it is present in more than 40 percent of tumor samples taken from patients with uveal melanoma. The findings are being published early online November 17, 2010 in the New England Journal of Medicine and will appear in the December 2, 2010, print issue. "These...

2010-11-08 15:04:26

Paving way for new therapeutic investigation Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have discovered that Vav1 "“ an oncogene (cancer-causing gene) found in recent years to be one of the factors in tumorous tissue growth -- plays a wider role in several types of cancer than had previously been thought. The discovery has implications for further concentration on targeting this gene in cancer research. The work of the researchers, led by Dr. Shulamit Katzav-Shapira of the...


Word of the Day
Cthulhu
  • A gigantic fictional humanoid alien god being described with a head resembling an octopus and dragon wings and claws, around whom an insane cult developed.
  • Pertaining to the mythos of Cthulhu and additional otherworldly beings created by H. P. Lovecraft or inspired by his writings and imitators.
This word was invented in 1926 by H.P. Lovecraft for his short story, 'The Call of Cthulhu.' 'Cthulhu' may be based on the word 'chthonic,' which in Greek mythology refers to the underworld.
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