Quantcast

Latest Oncogene Stories

2009-01-06 20:22:48

University of Cincinnati researchers say they've identified a tumor suppressor that may lead to new treatments for lung cancer. Lead author Jorge Moscat said the research focused on specific cellular events that occur in Ras-induced tumor development to better understand the underlying biological mechanisms leading to cancer. These interim steps are critical because they help us determine how best to intervene and stop cancer growth along the way, Moscat, chair of UC's cancer and cell...

36257f5e5964d00b6f6dde99c08a61bb1
2009-01-05 16:01:53

Cancer and cell biology experts at the University of Cincinnati (UC) have identified a new tumor suppressor that may help scientists develop more targeted drug therapies to combat lung cancer. The study, led by Jorge Moscat, PhD, appears in the January 2009 issue of Molecular and Cellular Biology. Proto-oncogenes are genes that play a role in normal cell growth (turnover of cells and tissue) but, when genetically modified, can cause the out-of-control cell division that leads to cancer....

2008-02-07 12:40:00

A protein naturally produced and secreted by the body can make the difference between your average mole and melanoma, which killed more than 8,000 people in the United States last year, reveals a new study in the February 8 issue of the journal Cell, a publication of Cell Press. If this natural anti-cancer agent, called IGFBP7, can be produced and delivered to tumors, it might serve as a targeted chemotherapy for metastatic melanoma, a condition which is "basically untreatable" today, said...

2005-11-14 12:33:07

Scientists have uncovered an unexpected functional link between a phosphatase known to act as a tumor suppressor and BCR/ABL, a kinase that is intimately linked with cancer development and progression in specific forms of leukemia. The study, published in the November issue of Cancer Cell, provides fresh insight into the molecular mechanisms that are involved in induction and progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), and suggests a new strategy that may be an effective therapy for...

2005-11-08 13:21:46

The Quaking gene, first described as a mutation in mice that causes rapid tremor, is thought to suppress tumor formation and protect humans from cancer. Now, a team of researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Wisconsin has shown that the Quaking gene likely suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting production of a protein associated with GLI1, a cancer-causing oncogene highly associated with severe birth defects and several childhood cancers. The group's study, published...

2005-07-14 16:20:00

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently caused by genetic alterations that affect transcription factors, such as AML1-ETO and mutations affecting genes involved in signal transduction pathways, such as FLT3. Mutations in AML1-ETO and FLT3 are two of the most common genetic alterations seen in patients with AML, but neither mutation alone can cause leukemia in animal models. Thus, it seemed the collaboration of both mutations together were necessary for blood progenitor cells to become...

2005-06-22 12:55:00

PHILADELPHIA "“ First discovered only a few brief years ago, microRNAs are small, remarkably powerful molecules that appear to play a pivotal role in gene silencing, one of the body's main strategies for regulating its genome. A scant 22 nucleotides in length, miRNAs appear to work by binding to and somehow interfering with messenger RNA, itself responsible for translating genes into proteins. But how do miRNAs arise? And what can we learn about their biological function from their...

2005-06-10 20:40:00

Rockville, MD -- Researchers led by Dr. Shiv Srivastava from the Center for Prostate Disease Research (CPDR), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), report the groundbreaking discovery of the ETS-Related Gene (ERG) as one of the frequent proto-oncogene overexpressions in prostate cancer cells. This discovery provides a very promising addition to a select group of genes, whose expression is frequently altered in prostate cancer cells and could provide novel molecular...

2005-06-08 23:33:47

Over the past few years, scientists have discovered that a new class of genetic regulators called "microRNAs" influences normal human growth and development. Now, researchers have found that microRNAs also play an important role in human cancer. The findings are published in tomorrow's issue of the journal Nature (June 9). "These studies change the landscape of cancer genetics by establishing the specific microRNAs expressed in most common cancers and investigating the effects of microRNAs...

2005-06-08 23:10:39

In discoveries that may open a new chapter in understanding and diagnosing cancer, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators and their colleagues have established that tiny microRNAs provide a novel genetic route to the initiation of some forms of cancer. The researchers published their discoveries in independent papers in the June 9, 2005, issue of the journal Nature. Their findings show that distinctive patterns of activity of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cancer cells can be used to diagnose...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
Related