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2005-09-23 13:13:13

By Anthony J. Brown, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - BRCA mutation-related breast cancers are known to greatly increase the risk of ovarian cancer, but new research indicates this association does not apply to other types of hereditary breast cancer. "I think this is very good news," Dr. Noah D. Kauff told Reuters Health, adding that about 50 percent of all hereditary breast cancers are not related to BRCA mutations. Also, most cases of breast cancer are sporadic, developing in women...

2005-07-25 15:26:00

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Treatment with a patch containing the hormone testosterone can increase sexual desire and activity in women who experience reduced sexual desire after surgical removal of the ovaries. The findings are based on a study of 447 women diagnosed with hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) after ovarian surgery, who were randomly assigned to receive testosterone patches, at one of three doses, or placebo for 24 weeks. A total of 318 women completed the trial....

2005-06-28 16:50:30

June 28, 2005 - Research shows that short-term hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is appropriate for peri- and postmenopausal women. These and other results from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), the largest, most statistically valid and well analyzed research evaluating the use of HRT, are reviewed in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer. In peri- and postmenopausal women who have moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms associated with estrogen deficiency, data shows that HRT...

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2004-12-05 10:42:28

Report endorses limited estrogen use HealthDayNews -- The value of hormone replacement therapy for postmenopausal women has taken a pounding in recent years. While it doesn't dispute the major findings that some forms of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can be dangerous, a recent report from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says some variations of short-term use can be effective and safe. Dr. Isaac Schiff, chairman of the 21-member ACOG Task Force that created the...

2004-12-01 09:00:08

Hormone replacement therapy, which has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer and stroke, should be used only in the short term to relieve menopausal symptoms, experts warned last night. Increased knowledge about the dangers of long-term use of HRT in the last two years has led to falling numbers of prescriptions and widespread confusion among women and the medical profession. Now the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) has reviewed all the data...

2004-12-01 09:00:08

HORMONE replacement therapy, which has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer and strokes, should be used only in the short term to relieve menopausal symptoms, doctors warned yesterday. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) has reviewed all the data surrounding HRT and published its recommendations in a new book, Menopause and Hormone Replacement. The book recommends that HRT should continue to be prescribed for women with severe menopausal symptoms,...

2004-12-01 09:00:08

THE debate over the value of hormone replacement therapy has raged for the last 30 years. In the early 1990s several studies were published that suggested that HRT had a protective benefit in preventing bone loss that could lead to osteoporosis. In the mid- 1990s there were studies suggesting a protective benefit for coronary heart disease. But over the past two years the debate has become even more contradictory and confusing, with the medical fraternity playing ping-pong with a series of...

2004-11-28 03:00:15

Remember July 2002? Some think of it as the summer that changed women's health care forever. That's when researchers abruptly halted part of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI), a major federally funded clinical study designed to assess the effect of long-term use of hormone therapy (HT) on women's health. Early results indicated that postmenopausal women using a combination estrogen/progestin medication called Prempro faced a slightly increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease, stroke...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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