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Cellar Spider Pholcus phalangioides
2014-04-07 13:05:31

The Cellar Spider (Pholcus phalangioides), known also as the Skull Spider because of its cephalothorax resembling a human skull, is a spider belonging to the family Pholcidae. The females have a body length of about 9 millimeters; the males are slightly smaller. The legs are about 5 to 6 times the length of the body. Its habit of living on the ceilings of room, garages, caves, or cellars gives...

Tailed Daddy Longlegs Spider Crossopriza lyoni
2014-04-07 12:30:20

Crossopriza lyoni is a widespread species of cellar spiders that prefer to live in or around human structures. They are commonly known as Tailed Cellar Spiders, Tailed Daddy Longlegs Spiders, and occasionally Box Spiders. They all possess exceptionally long and fragile legs that can reach up to 2.4 inches long and a body length of that ranges from .098 to .28 inches. Their abdomens are...

Daddy-long-legs Spider
2009-05-02 21:51:47

The Daddy-long-legs Spider (Pholcus phalangioides), also known as the Cellar Spider or Skull Spider, is a species of arachnid found in many parts of the world, but originally came from the tropics. They are commonly found living in caves, garages, ceilings of household rooms, and cellars. In Australia, it is considered a beneficial species as it kills and eats the venomous redback Spider. There...

Crane fly
2005-09-08 15:08:50

The crane flies (Tipulidae) are a family of insects that closely resemble giant mosquitoes. Like the mosquito, they are in the order Diptera (flies) and are sometimes called mosquito eaters, mosquito hawks, or skeeter eaters. They are also one of three unrelated arthropods named Daddy long-legs. The other two are the harvestmen and vibrating, cellar or house spider. As such, Crane Flies are...

Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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