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Latest Optical trapping Stories

Low-powered Nanotweezers May Benefit Cellular-level Studies By Demonstrating New Capabilities
2012-09-17 17:08:19

Using ultra-low input power densities, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated for the first time how low-power “optical nanotweezers” can be used to trap, manipulate, and probe nanoparticles, including fragile biological samples. “We already know that plasmonic nanoantennas enhance local fields by up to several orders of magnitude, and thus, previously showed that we can use these structures with a regular CW laser source to make...

Tiny Creatures Captured With Ultrasound Using Acoustic Tweezers
2012-06-29 11:44:26

A device about the size of a dime can manipulate living materials such as blood cells and entire small organisms, using sound waves, according to a team of bioengineers and biochemists from Penn State. The device, called acoustic tweezers, is the first technology capable of touchlessly trapping and manipulating Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a one millimeter long roundworm that is an important model system for studying diseases and development in humans. Acoustic tweezers are also...

2012-01-12 21:31:48

University of Illinois researchers have shown that by tuning the properties of laser light illuminating arrays of metal nanoantennas, these nano-scale structures allow for dexterous optical tweezing as well as size-sorting of particles. "Nanoantennas are extremely popular right now because they are really good at concentrating optical fields in small areas,” explained Kimani Toussaint, Jr., an assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering at the University of Illinois at...

2011-11-09 22:36:30

Not to pick up electrons, but tweezers made of electrons. A recent paper by researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Virginia (UVA) demonstrates that the beams produced by modern electron microscopes can be used not just to look at nanoscale objects, but to move them around, position them and perhaps even assemble them. Essentially, they say, the tool is an electron version of the laser "optical tweezers" that have become a standard...

Image 1 - Plasmonic Optical Tweezers Trap Tightly Without Overheating
2011-09-26 09:58:58

   Improved device eliminates a barrier to handling nanoscale particles Engineers at Harvard have created a device that may make it easier to isolate and study tiny particles such as viruses. Their plasmonic nanotweezers, revealed this month in Nature Communications, use light from a laser to trap nanoscale particles. The new device creates strong forces more efficiently than traditional optical tweezers and eliminates a problem that caused earlier setups to overheat....

2011-01-26 12:06:56

There is considerable interest in understanding transport and information pathways in living cells. It is crucial for both the transport of, for example, medicine into cells, the regulation of cell life processes and their signalling with their environment. New research in biophysics at the Niels Bohr Institute shows surprisingly that the transport mechanisms do not follow the expected pattern. The results have been published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters. The researchers...

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2010-07-07 07:33:26

Star Trek fans will remember "tractor beams," lasers that allowed the Starship Enterprise to trap and move objects. Tel Aviv University is now turning this science fiction into science fact "” on a nano scale. A new tool developed by Tel Aviv University, Holographic Optical Tweezers (HOTs) use holographic technology to manipulate up to 300 nanoparticles at a time, such as beads of glass or polymer, that are too small and delicate to be handled with traditional laboratory instruments....

2009-10-04 15:30:13

Professors at the University of Illinois in Champaign say they have discovered a way to better study the bacterial swimming of E. coli. University of Illinois physics professor Yann Chemla said in a release from the university Sunday by using optical traps, microfluidic chambers and fluorescence, he and physics professor Ido Golding were able to better track the behavior of bacteria cells. Using lasers in the optical traps, the researchers were able to keep individual bacteria cells...

2009-08-31 10:59:55

U.S. scientists say they've developed a system that uses sound as tiny tweezers to manipulate objects such as single cells or nanosized beads. Current methods for moving individual cells or tiny beads include such devices as optical tweezers, which require a lot of energy and could damage or even kill live cells, said Penn State Assistant Professor Tony Jun Huang. Acoustic tweezers are much smaller than optical tweezers and use 500,000 times less energy. While optical tweezers are large and...

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2009-08-28 12:30:00

Manipulating tiny objects like single cells or nanosized beads often requires relatively large, unwieldy equipment, but now a system that uses sound as a tiny tweezers can be small enough to place on a chip, according to Penn State engineers."Current methods for moving individual cells or tiny beads include such devices as optical tweezers, which require a lot of energy and could damage or even kill live cells," said Tony Jun Huang, assistant professor of engineering science and mechanics....


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malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'