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Latest Organ donation Stories

2011-12-22 12:35:30

Research published today in the British Journal of Anaesthesia suggests that organ donation rates in the UK could be increased if the current issues affecting declined consent are improved. At present, only 30% of the UK population are registered on the NHS Organ Donor Register (ODR). From 2003 to 2005, the overall consent rate for donation after brain death (DBD) was 59%. This figure remains largely unchanged with a consent rate of 63% for DBD in 2007-2009. The low consent rate for organ...

2011-12-02 13:11:43

U-M researcher finds patients would rather be on waiting list than accept an organ with higher risk of failure Liver transplantation candidates want to be involved in decisions regarding quality of the donor organ, and many are reluctant to accept organs with a higher risk of failure, according to research by U-M physicians and experts. More than 42 percent of patients would choose to remain on the waiting list rather than accept a "lower quality" liver according to the study's lead...

2011-12-02 01:32:51

New research reveals that liver transplantation candidates want to be involved in decisions regarding quality of the donor organ, and many are reluctant to accept organs with a higher risk of failure. In fact, more than 42% of patients would choose to remain on the waiting list rather than accept a "lower quality" liver according to the study appearing in the December issue of Liver Transplantation, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Association for the Study of...

2011-12-01 08:00:00

According to post-transplant patient David Courtney, Americaâs present system of organ donation that relies primarily on âœaltruismâ is failing miserably in meeting the demand for organs because the waiting list keeps increasing rapidly, now nearing 113,000 according to the United Network for Organ Sharing, the Federally contracted operator of the US Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network. According to the Los Angeles Times, on...

2011-11-30 10:48:32

Removing organs for transplant unless person explicitly opts out of donation before death not best way to address scarcity, raises sticky ethical questions Changing the organ donation process in this country from opt-in -- by, say, checking a box on a driver's license application -- to opt-out, which presumes someone's willingness to donate after death unless they explicitly object while alive, would not be likely to increase the donation rate in the United States, new Johns Hopkins...

2011-11-16 07:32:48

Head to Head: Is it unethical for doctors to encourage healthy adults to donate a kidney to a stranger? With three people on the kidney transplant list dying in the UK every day, should doctors encourage their patients to put themselves at risk for the benefit of others? Two experts debate the issue on bmj.com today. Associate Professor Walter Glannon from the University of Calgary argues that, although living kidney donation is relatively safe, "this does not imply that doctors should...

2011-11-15 05:05:00

263 Hospitals Evaluated on HealthGrades.com; Hospitals with Best Outcomes in Kidney, Lung, Heart and Liver Transplants Receive Transplant Excellence Awardâ“ž¢ Denver, CO (PRWEB) November 14, 2011 HealthGrades, the leading provider of information to help consumers make an informed decision about a physician or hospital, today made available to organ transplant patients a list of those hospitals with the best track record for survival and chances of receiving a...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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