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Latest Organ trade Stories

2009-01-12 12:09:51

Reputable U.S. medical centers transplant kidneys and other human organs they get illegally through the black market, a university anthropologist asserts. Surgeons take black-market kidneys from people in the world's most impoverished slums and put them into wealthy dialysis patients from the United States, Europe and Israel, Nancy Scheper-Hughes of the University of California at Berkeley told Newsweek. She did not identify any hospitals, but Newsweek said she cited a big Philadelphia...

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2008-10-16 11:09:08

Living donor kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment option for patients with end stage renal disease. The outcomes of this type of transplant are superior to waiting for several years on the deceased donor transplant list while on dialysis. 38 percent of all kidney transplants in the U.S. are now performed using living donors. However, some patients do not have access living donors who are both willing and medically eligible to give them a kidney. As a result, some are now turning...

2008-10-06 03:00:29

By Gustafson, Jeanne Sacred Heart Medical Center has performed its first kidney transplant accomplished in a domino-effect scenario that involves two live donors and two recipients, triggering use of a matching approach hospital officials believe will boost kidney transplants here by 25 percent. Separately, Sacred Heart says it plans to add pancreas transplants to its 27-year-old kidney transplant program. Last week the hospital completed what's called a domino-paired kidney transplant,...

2008-10-03 03:00:00

By McKay, Dianne Potter, Steven R; Behrend, Terry; Stella, Frank; Steinberg, Steven The need for deceased donor organs for kidney transplantation in the United States continues to increase. The increasing demand has fueled desperate attempts by patients to circumvent the long waiting list of the United Network for Organ Sharing. We report 4 patients with end-stage kidney disease who sought and obtained a live donor kidney transplant outside the United States. In each case, a nephrologist...

2008-08-04 03:00:32

By Bednar, Joseph Edward Reilly needed a new kidney. His wife, Karen, volunteered to be his donor, but she wasn't a match. Meanwhile, Calvin Denson also awaited a kidney donation. After a year of submitting to dialysis three times a week, he felt close to giving up hope. Then Karen Reilly learned about the New England Program for Kidney Exchange, which helps people whose living donors aren't compatible matches. The program uses a computer program to find cases where the donor in an...

2008-07-14 09:01:11

Singapore should not rule out organ trading yet: minister SINGAPORE, July 14 (Xinhua) -- Singapore's Health Minister Khaw Boon Wan on Sunday said Singapore is not ruling out legalizing organ trading. Monday's English daily The Straits Times quoted Khaw as saying organ shortages and a black market in the region made legalizing trading an option. "I think we should not write off or reject the idea of selling organs. But I think we need to study it carefully," he said. Singapore laws...

2008-07-03 18:00:00

BOSTON, Massachusetts, July 3 /PRNewswire/ -- The July 5 issue of the leading medical journal, The Lancet, highlights the Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism, an important affirmation of ethical principles and practices adopted on May 2, 2008, at an International Summit of more than 150 healthcare professionals, officials, scientists, ethicists and legal scholars from 78 countries and 20 international organizations. A Commentary, authored by the 32-member...

2008-06-22 12:00:34

By Sally Satel and Nadey Hakim This was the question recently posed in the prestigious British Medical Journal. An American transplant surgeon (in favor of selling kidneys) squared off against an Australian nephrologist (against). In an accompanying article, a leading British transplant surgeon called for legalizing organ sales. Coverage in the British press had a positive spin. "Surgeon: Organ trade should be legalized" was The Independent's headline; "Legalize trade in donor organs,...

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2008-06-13 13:39:29

Doctors in this week's BMJ debate the issue of selling kidneys.A regulated system of compensation for living donors may be the solution to the growing shortage of kidneys for transplantation, writes Arthur Matas, Professor of Surgery at the University of Minnesota.In many areas of the United States the average wait for a transplant from a deceased donor is five years, but in some parts it is as long 10 years. Because of this the annual death rate for suitable transplant candidates has risen...

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2008-02-21 09:00:00

NEW DELHI -- For the past seven years, Rajesh Gupta has spent 12 hours a week in a hospital bed, hooked up to a hemodialysis machine. He would prefer to undergo a transplant to replace his failed kidneys. But India has no national organ waiting list, few registered organ donors and a legal system that bars transplants from most living donors except for close family members. That means Gupta, with no donor matches in his family, must pay about $900 a month for dialysis treatments for life....


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'