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Latest Organelle Stories

cicada
2014-09-01 02:10:59

John McCutcheon, The University of Montana Two is company, three is a crowd. But in the case of the cicada, that’s a good thing. Until a recent discovery by a University of Montana research lab, it was thought that cicadas had a symbiotic relationship with two important bacteria that live within the cells of its body. Since the insect eats a simple diet consisting solely of plant sap, it relies on these bacteria to produce the nutrients it needs for survival. In exchange, those two...

2013-07-10 15:19:39

Photosynthesis takes place in specialized membrane systems, made up of stacked disks linked together by unstacked planar leaflets. An LMU team has now identified a protein that tucks the membrane in at the edge of each stack. By making use of sunlight to generate molecular oxygen and other energy-rich chemical compounds that other organisms can utilize as nutrients, photosynthesis provides the basis for almost all life on Earth. Radiant energy from the Sun is captured by pigment-protein...

2013-04-30 14:18:23

Research published in the May 2013 journal GENETICS may shed light on the root cause of some neurodegenerative diseases Scientists have identified a gene that keeps our nerve fibers from clogging up. Researchers in Ken Miller's laboratory at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation (OMRF) found that the unc-16 gene of the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans encodes a gatekeeper that restricts flow of cellular organelles from the cell body to the axon, a long, narrow extension that neurons use...

2012-12-03 16:09:37

The work has implications for cancer drug development Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have determined how two proteins help create organelles, or specialized subunits within a cell, that play a vital role in maintaining cell health. This discovery opens the door for research on substances that could interfere with the formation of these organelles and lead to new therapies for cancer. The study, published online ahead of print on December 2, 2012, by the journal...

Why Cells And Organelles Don't Get Stuck
2012-08-31 11:44:50

Researchers explain 'hydration repulsion' between biomembranes Biomembranes enclose biological cells like a skin. They also surround organelles that carry out important functions in metabolism and cell division. Scientists have long known in principle how biomembranes are built up, and also that water molecules play a role in maintaining the optimal distance between neighboring membranes–otherwise they could not fulfill their vital functions. Now, with the help of computer...

By Keeping Their 'Antennae' Up, Lipid Helps Cells Find Their Way
2012-07-09 15:07:12

A lipid that helps lotion soften the skin also helps cells find and stay in the right location in the body by ensuring they keep their "antennae" up, scientists report. Each cell has an antenna, or cilium, that senses the environment then determines where to go and what to do when it arrives, said Dr. Erhard Bieberich, biochemist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University. "A cell is blind; it does not see, it does not feel; it doesn't know where it is,"...

2012-04-18 09:20:01

Engineered particles tied to penetratin discover, deliver ligands for mitochondria, ribosomes Scientists who developed a technology for identifying and targeting unique protein receptor ZIP Codes on the cellular surface have found a way to penetrate the outer membrane and deliver engineered particles - called iPhage - to organelles inside the cell. In a paper published today online in Nature Communications, the team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center...

2012-03-01 02:01:21

Promising avenue of neurodegenerative disease research may be a dead end In science, refuting a hypothesis can be as significant as proving one, all the more so in research aimed at elucidating how diseases proceed with a view toward preventing, treating, or curing them. Such a discovery can save scientists from spending precious years of effort exploring a dead end. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Munich-based researchers refute a widely...

2012-02-21 15:10:48

Genome analysis of “living fossil” sheds light on the evolution of plants Atmospheric oxygen really took off on our planet about 2.4 billion years ago during the Great Oxygenation Event. At this key juncture of our planet´s evolution, species had either to learn to cope with this poison that was produced by photosynthesizing cyanobacteria or they went extinct. It now seems strange to think that the gas that sustains much of modern life had such a distasteful beginning....


Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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