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New Research Shows Bacteria Swim With Whole Body Not Just

New Research Shows Bacteria Swim With Whole Body, Not Just Propellers

Brown University When it comes to swimming, the bodies of some bacteria are more than just dead weight, according to new research from Brown University. Many bacteria swim using flagella, corkscrew-like appendages that push or pull...

Latest Organelles Stories

2014-07-11 10:29:58

Ohio State University Scientists identify protein in bacteria with essential role in survival Scientists have identified a protein that is essential to the survival of E. coli bacteria, and consider the protein a potential new target for antibiotics. In the study, the researchers confirmed that this protein, called MurJ, flips a fatty molecule from one side of a bacterial cell membrane to the other. If that molecule isn't flipped, the cell cannot construct a critical layer that...

2014-06-27 18:45:05

University of Minnesota Academic Health Center New structures discovered within cilia show a relationship between certain proteins and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The discovery, made at the University of Minnesota, was named paper of the week in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, and sheds new light on the microstructure of cilia. Cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures occurring in large numbers on the surface of some of the body's cells and are involved in movement and...

2014-06-24 10:39:41

Washington University in St. Louis Researchers believe they have learned how mutations in the gene that causes Huntington’s disease kill brain cells, a finding that could open new opportunities for treating the fatal disorder. Scientists first linked the gene to the inherited disease more than 20 years ago. Huntington’s disease affects five to seven people out of every 100,000. Symptoms, which typically begin in middle age, include involuntary jerking movements, disrupted...

2014-06-10 08:30:28

POINT ROBERTS, Wash. and NEW YORK, June 10, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Investorideas.com, a global news source covering leading sectors including biotech and medical technology issues a Q&A interview with Mr. James A. Joyce ,Chairman and CEO of Aethlon Medical, Inc. (OTCBB: AEMD). Mr. Joyce shares insight into the emerging Immuno-Oncology market and the opportunity it represents. Q: Investorideas.com How did Aethlon Medical become involved in cancer research? A: James A. Joyce,...

2014-06-09 10:48:48

Brookhaven National Laboratory Structure of membrane protein that plays a role in signaling cell death could be new target for anticancer drugs Sometimes a cell has to die—when it's done with its job or inflicted with injury that could otherwise harm an organism. Conversely, cells that refuse to die when expected can lead to cancer. So scientists interested in fighting cancer have been keenly interested in learning the details of "programmed cell death." They want to understand what...

2014-06-03 08:32:14

NEW YORK, June 3, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Exosome Diagnostics, a leading developer of non-invasive, biofluid-based molecular diagnostics, today announced that Vincent J. O'Neill, M.D., has been appointed as its chief medical officer. Dr. O'Neill has extensive experience in clinical trial design, regulatory issues, and personalized medicine, most recently as global head Personalized of Medicine and Companion Diagnostics at Sanofi. At Sanofi, he defined the personalized medicine...

2014-05-28 08:31:28

NEW YORK, May 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Exosome Diagnostics, a leading developer of non-invasive, biofluid-based molecular diagnostics, today announced that William J. Kelly has been appointed as its chief financial officer, effective May 27, 2014. Mr. Kelly, 43, has over 20 years of financial management experience, including the past 13 years leading growing, international, publicly traded life science companies. For the past six years, Mr. Kelly worked at RepliGen Corporation,...

2014-05-21 12:13:31

Aarhus University A few years ago researchers described a Turkish family whose family members moved around on all fours. It turned out that they lacked the sense of equilibrium. This was caused by the rare neurological disease CAMRQ, which is the result of a mutation in the lipid pump in the cells. On the other hand, it was not known why the genetic error had such serious consequences. The discovery provided inspiration for a Danish study of the mechanism for the vital lipid pump...

2014-05-21 11:59:58

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) When the English author Sir Francis Bacon wrote "The world's a bubble" in 1629, it's a safe bet he wasn't thinking about microfluidics. However, for a research team led by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Bacon's words could not be truer. Since 2004, their world has revolved around the development of increasingly sophisticated microfluidic devices to produce liquid-filled "bubbles" called...

2014-04-28 09:32:17

A new study from researchers at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI), published today in Cell Reports, sheds light on a mysterious gene that likely influences cardiovascular health. After five years, UOHI researchers now know how one genetic variant works and suspect that it contributes to the development of heart disease through processes that promote chronic inflammation and cell division. Researchers at the Ruddy Canadian Cardiovascular Genetics Centre had initially...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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