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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 13:24 EDT

Latest Organelles Stories

2011-01-25 15:06:00

MELBOURNE, Fla., Jan. 25, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- According to a study published in Molecular Psychiatry by Dr. Daniel Rossignol (International Child Development Resource Center, Melbourne FL, Aid for Autism) and Dr. Richard Frye (University of Texas), children with autism are more likely to have abnormal function of a key part of the cell called the mitochondria (http://www.nature.com/mp/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/mp2010136a.html). Mitochondria are best known for producing energy for the...

2011-01-18 22:52:55

The Ras oncogene "“ frequently mutated in cancers "“ was once thought to act at the outermost region of the cell called the plasma membrane. However, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine demonstrated first in yeast and now in mammalian cells that the Ras protein also has activity in the interior of the cell called the cytoplasm, and that its effectiveness in cancer causation depends on where it is. "In this study, we wanted to know if the cytoplasmic Ras pathway can be found...

2011-01-06 16:57:04

Medical researchers who crave a means of exploring the genetic culprits behind a host of neuromuscular disorders may have just had their wish granted by a team working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where scientists have performed surgery on single cells to extract and examine their mitochondria. The scientists reached into these cells and extracted their "engines""”the mitochondria that are in large part responsible for our metabolism. Many human cells...

2011-01-06 16:29:47

In making your pro-longevity resolutions, like drinking more red wine and maintaining a vibrant social network, here's one you likely forgot: dialing down your mitochondria. It turns out that slowing the engines of these tiny cellular factories could extend your life-an observation relevant not only to aging research but to our understanding of how cells communicate with each another. So report researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in the Jan. 7, 2011, issue of Cell. Howard...

2010-12-14 01:06:47

Understanding how lignin building blocks are transported could break down barriers to biofuel production One big challenge in converting plants to biofuels is that the very same molecules that keep plants standing up make it hard to break them down. Now scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory are unraveling details of how plant cells' structural supports - their cell walls - are made, with the hope of finding ways to change their composition for more...

2010-12-13 15:45:13

Fighting cancer and steering immune reactions What makes cancer cells so dangerous is that they grow in an unregulated way and proliferate much faster than other cells. The proteasome, a large protein complex, plays a key role in this process: By breaking down used proteins for recycling, it clears the way for the next cycle. New hope was spawned several years ago with the discovery that inhibiting proteasomes can be used as a means to put the brakes on cell growth. In the mean time, the...

2010-12-06 14:05:24

Einstein College of Medicine research shows certain genes are 'clueless' Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have made an unexpected finding about the method by which certain genes are activated. Contrary to what researchers have traditionally assumed, genes that work with other genes to build protein structures do not act in a coordinated way but instead are turned on randomly. The surprising discovery, described in the December 5 online edition of Nature...

2010-12-03 07:12:25

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Children with autism are much more likely to have deficits in their ability to produce cellular energy than typically developing children. The researchers found that cumulative damage and oxidative stress in mitochondria, the energy producer of the cell, could influence the onset and severity of autism, suggesting a strong link between autism and mitochondrial defects. The authors believe that lack of ability to fuel the brain neurons might lead to some of the...

2010-11-25 22:08:47

Accurate gene distribution during cell division depends on stable set-up Scientists have discovered an amazingly simple way that cells stabilize their machinery for forcing apart chromosomes. Their findings are reported Nov. 25 in Nature. When a cell gets ready to split into new cells, this stable set-up permits its genetic material to be separated and distributed accurately. Otherwise, problem cells "“ like cancer cells"” arise. The human body contains more than a trillion cells,...

2010-11-17 16:58:48

The cells in the different parts of this video are always the same (grey), but, like actors using make-up to highlight different facial features, they have fluorescent labels that mark different cellular components in different colours: blue shows the nucleus, yellow shows tubulin (a component of the cell's scaffolding), red shows mitochondria, cyan shows the membranes of vesicles called endosomes, and purple shows other membrane structures. Instead of spending hours applying first one colour...