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Latest Organelles Stories

2011-06-01 07:47:09

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Cells, like ordinary households, produce "garbage" "“ debris and dysfunctional elements "“ that need disposal. When the mechanism for taking out this garbage fails, rare genetic diseases called lysosomal storage disorders (including Tay-Sachs, Batten and Fabry disease) can disable and even kill the children they affect. In adults, such failure leads to neurodegenerative diseases that occur later in life, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. An...

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2011-05-19 08:12:04

Salk scientists grow understanding of how photosynthesis is regulated The seeds sprouting in your spring garden may still be struggling to reach the sun. If so, they are consuming a finite energy pack contained within each seed. Once those resources are depleted, the plant cell nucleus must be ready to switch on a "green" photosynthetic program. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies recently showed a new way that those signals are relayed. In a study published in the May...

2011-05-18 16:32:56

How do genes control us? This fundamental question of life still remains elusive despite decades of research. Genes are blueprints for proteins, but it is the proteins that actually carry out vital functions in the body for maintaining life. Diseases such as cancer are not only characterized by altered genes, but also by disturbed protein production. But how is protein production controlled? Researchers of the Max Delbrck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch of the Helmholtz...

2011-05-11 00:47:58

Mitochondria are the body's energy producers, the power stations inside our cells. Researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have now identified a group of mitochondrial proteins, the absence of which allows other protein groups to stabilise the genome. This could delay the onset of age-related diseases and increase lifespan. Some theories of human ageing suggest that the power generators of the cell, the mitochondria, play a part in the process. In addition to supplying us with...

2011-05-04 15:06:01

Scientists have discovered a new component of mitochondria that plays a key part in their function. The discovery, which is presented in the journal Cell Metabolism, is of potential significance to our understanding of both inherited and age-related diseases. Mitochondria are normally called the cell's power plants since they convert the energy in our food into a form that the body can use. To work properly, the mitochondria have to form new proteins, which they do in their ribosomes. A group...

2011-05-01 00:09:03

MitoAction announces the second annual Sandra K. Russell Derby Day Benefit for Mito, a Derby Day fundraiser to support those who are battling mitochondrial disease. The benefit will be held on Saturday, May 7 from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Mandarin Oriental, Boston. Up to four hundred guests will celebrate and watch the Kentucky Derby Race and enjoy delicious food, drinks, music, contests, fabulous auction items, and prizes. (PRWEB) April 29, 2011 The event is held in memory of Sandra K....

2011-04-28 21:19:59

FINDINGS: Whitehead Institute scientists report that two proteins once thought to have only supporting roles, are the true "stars" of the kinetochore assembly process in human cells. RELEVANCE: The kinetochore is vital to proper DNA distribution during cell division. This finding suggests that scientists may be able to stimulate kinetochore assembly in a process that could lead to new genetic research tools, such as efficient creation of artificial human chromosomes. Widespread use of...

2011-04-27 11:42:43

Laboratory reports success in blocking the lethal effects of ALS Brandeis researchers have made a significant advance in the effort to understand amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by successfully reversing the toxicity of the mutated protein in the familial type of the disease. Currently there is no cure or prevention for the disease, which affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. Most frequently referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, after its most famous victim, ALS typically...

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2011-04-23 10:50:00

Research in the worm is shedding light on a protein associated with a number of different human cancers, and may point to a highly targeted way to treat them.University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists were studying a worm protein called TFG-1, which is present in many cell types but whose exact role had never been understood. The scientists discovered that the protein controls key aspects of the movement, or secretion, of growth factors out of cells."TFG-1 has never been implicated in the...

2011-04-18 13:05:01

In two new studies, researchers provide the first detailed view of the elaborate chemical and mechanical interactions that allow the ribosome "“ the cell's protein-building machinery "“ to insert a growing protein into the cellular membrane. The first study, in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, gives an atom-by-atom snapshot of a pivotal stage in the insertion process: the moment just after the ribosome docks to a channel in the membrane and the newly forming protein winds...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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