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Latest Organism Stories

Taxonomy Boris Vinatzer
2014-02-24 04:45:12

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A new naming system proposed by one Virginia Tech scientist proposes moving beyond the current biological naming system and supplementing it with a new classification method based on an organism’s genome sequence. The new method was developed by Boris Vinatzer, an associate professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Science's Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology, and Weed Science, and he believes that it will create a...

Evolution Remained Stuck In Slime For A Billion Years
2014-02-19 15:18:39

Science in Public Tasmanian researchers have revealed ancient conditions that almost ended life on Earth, using a new technique they developed to hunt for mineral deposits. The first life developed in the ancient oceans around 3.6 billion years ago, but then nothing much happened. Life remained as little more than a layer of slime for a billion years. Suddenly, 550 million years ago, evolution burst back into action – and here we are today. So what was the hold-up during those 'boring...

Kleiber's Law Helps Explain The Shape Of Evolution
2014-02-18 06:34:32

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online During its lifetime, the heart of a mouse beats about the same number of times as an elephant. However, the mouse only lives about a year, while the elephant might live to the age of 70. Scientists have also observed that small plants and animals mature faster than large ones, and that nature has created radically different forms for life—from the loose-limbed beauty of a flowering tree to the fearful symmetry of a tiger....

The Lifespan Of The Worm Predicted With Accuracy In New Study
2014-02-14 13:11:49

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists claim they have found a way to accurately predict the lifespan of a worm, meaning fortune tellers should be updating their LinkedIn profiles pretty soon. Researchers, publishing a paper in the journal Nature, say they have found a way to determine an organism’s lifespan by looking at the bursts of activity in the mitochondria, which is part of the cell which generates energy. “Mitochondrial flashes have an amazing...

Photosynthesis-Activating Protein Likely Predates Oxygen On Earth
2014-02-09 08:21:12

[ Watch the Video: Photosynthesis Older Than Oxygen ] redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online Thioredoxin, a protein essential to the process of photosynthesis in plants, likely developed on Earth long before oxygen ever became available, according to a study published in last week’s early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In the study, an international team of researchers analyzing methane-producing microbes found that...

Ice Worms Insights Into Surviving The Cold
2014-01-30 16:11:27

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While the Polar Vortex may have kept temperatures around New Jersey dangerously low, scientists at the state’s Rutgers University-Camden have been working on combating the cold on a biological level, by keeping cellular energy up. “If you want to live in the cold, you have to make lots of energy,” said Daniel Shain, a professor of biology at Rutgers–Camden. “That means your cells would have to produce more adenosine...

Ocean Acidification Long Term Research
2014-01-28 13:43:59

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online More research is necessary for an accurate determination of how marine species will cope long-term with ocean acidification, according to a new research review in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution. "We can't measure evolutionary responses in all organisms, so we need to choose carefully to get the most bang for our buck," said review author Jennifer Sunday, a post-doctoral researcher at The University of British Columbia in...

2014-01-27 10:25:54

The evolutionary path from unicellular life to multicellularity is varied, but all lead to complex organisms In the beginning there were single cells. Today, many millions of years later, most plants, animals, fungi, and algae are composed of multiple cells that work collaboratively as a single being. Despite the various ways these organisms achieved multicellularity, their conglomeration of cells operate cooperatively to consume energy, survive, and reproduce. But how did multicellularity...

Bigger Really Was Better For Early Prehistoric Life
2014-01-24 14:38:14

[ Watch the Video: The Evolution of the World’s Oldest Fossil Communities ] University of Toronto A NASA research group featuring University of Toronto Mississauga professor Marc Laflamme has helped to explain why some prehistoric organisms evolved into larger animals. Laflamme, an assistant professor with the Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, and his colleagues at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Node of NASA's Astrobiology Institute suggest that height...

2014-01-03 15:13:57

Press release from PLOS Computational Biology Scientists have demonstrated that organisms with greater complexity are more likely to evolve in complex environments, according to research published this week in PLOS Computational Biology. The researchers, based at École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne and University of Vermont, created a programme that simulated the evolution of virtual creatures in a variety of landscapes. Each virtual organism was made using a particular form of...


Latest Organism Reference Libraries

0_bffac8301e079e95e303e46c4a8c2b3d
2014-01-12 00:00:00

Biology is the study of living organisms. Before the 19th century, biology was known as natural history (the study of all living things). Gottfried Reinhold Treviranus was the first person to coin the term biology. Biology comes from the Greek words bios (meaning "life") and logia (meaning "study of"). It is a common science that is a standard subject in schools and universities around the world. Over a million papers are published annually in biology and medicinal journals. Not just a...

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Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.