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Latest Organs Stories

2012-06-21 21:07:02

Findings could open avenues for improved therapies for a range of conditions Researchers at McGill University have discovered the cause of an inherited form of epilepsy. The disease, known as double-cortex syndrome, primarily affects females and arises from mutations on a gene located on the X chromosome. Drs. Susanne Bechstedt and Gary Brouhard of the Department of Biology have used a highly advanced microscope to discover how these mutations cause a malformation of the human brain. The...

2012-06-21 12:03:05

Fish-saving sound threshold recommended for pile driving projects The rise of ocean infrastructure development to tap energy sources such as tides, offshore wind and natural gas will require more pile driving, the practice of pounding long, hollow steel pipes called piles into the ocean floor to support energy turbines and other structures. But pile driving creates loud, underwater booms that can harm fish and other marine animals. Many scientists and regulators have assumed that...

2012-06-07 08:31:09

Using rabies virus, researcher tracks inputs to dopamine neurons A genetically-modified version of the rabies virus is helping scientists at Harvard to trace neural pathways in the brain, a research effort that could one day lead to treatments for Parkinson's disease and addiction. As described in a paper published on June 7 in the journal Neuron, a team of researchers led by Associate Professor of Molecular and Cellular Biology Naoshige Uchida used the virus to create the first-ever...

2012-06-01 11:28:36

Changes to just three genetic letters among billions led to evolution and development of the mammalian motor sensory network, and laid the groundwork for the defining characteristics of the human brain, Yale University researchers report. This networks provides the direct synaptic connections between the multi-layered neocortex in the human brain responsible for emotions, perception, and cognition and the neural centers of the brain that make fine motor skills possible. A description of...

2012-05-23 18:54:40

Brains that maintain healthy nerve connections as we age help keep us sharp in later life, new research funded by the charity Age UK has found. Older people with robust brain 'wiring' — that is, the nerve fibers that connect different, distant brain areas — can process information quickly and that this makes them generally smarter, the study suggests. According to the findings, joining distant parts of the brain together with better wiring improves mental performance,...

2012-05-22 21:41:23

University of Georgia researchers have developed a map of the human brain that shows great promise as a new guide to the inner workings of the body's most complex and critical organ. With this map, researchers hope to create a next-generation brain atlas that will be an alternative option to the atlas created by German anatomist Korbinian Brodmann more than 100 years ago, which is still commonly used in clinical and research settings. Tianming Liu, assistant professor of computer...

2012-05-22 08:34:02

A routine endoscopy can detect cancer in the pancreas in the nearby adjacent small intestine due to cancer's 'field effect' By simply shining a tiny light within the small intestine, close to that organ's junction with the pancreas, physicians at Mayo Clinic's campus in Florida have been able to detect pancreatic cancer 100 percent of the time in a small study. The light, attached to a probe, measures changes in cells and blood vessels in the small intestine produced by a growing cancer in...

Human Brain Evolution Triggered By Duplicate Gene
2012-05-04 08:21:12

Brett Smith for Redorbit.com Scientists may have just found a ℠missing link´ in the form of a partial, duplicate gene that appears to be responsible for human brain development - the most distinguishing characteristic of our species. The genetic variation occurred in man´s ape-like ancestor about two or three million years ago, according to a pair of studies published online in the journal Cell. A team led by researchers at the Scripps Research Institute found that a...

2012-04-26 13:57:35

A research team at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has succeeded in describing the structure and function of the outermost layer of the skin — the stratum corneum — at a molecular level. This opens the way not only for the large-scale delivery of drugs via the skin, but also for a deeper understanding of skin diseases. "You could say that we've solved the puzzle of the skin barrier, something that has great potential significance for dermatology," says principal investigator...

2012-04-19 13:05:50

A new study presented today at the International Liver Congress 2012 indicates the potential for gallbladder tissue (which is routinely discarded from organ donors and surgical interventions) to be a highly available candidate source for multipotential stem cells. Biliary tree stem/progenitor cells (BTSCs) have previously been identified in the glands of normal adult human extrahepatic bile ducts and been shown to generate in vitro and in vivo mature cells of the hepato-biliary and...


Latest Organs Reference Libraries

Liver
2013-04-30 14:18:06

The liver is the organ in charge of processing, neutralizing and excreting certain secretions for the metabolic processes. Formation and Orientation The liver is considered to be both the largest internal organ and the largest gland in the human body. It is situated just below the diaphragm, to the right of the stomach and on top of the gallbladder. There are two ways blood can travel to and from the liver: the hepatic artery and the portal vein. The hepatic artery carries blood solely...

Esophagus
2013-04-30 13:37:01

The esophagus is the muscular tube that is located between the pharynx and the stomach that aids in digestion during swallowing. Formation and Orientation The esophagus is composed of four separate layers; the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa and the adventitia. The mucosa includes the stratified squamous epithelium, lamina propria and muscularis mucosae. The submucosa houses the esophageal glands and connective papillae. The muscularis externa is composed of three sublayers The...

Ovaries
2013-03-05 14:55:04

The ovaries are the two reproductive female organs where the eggs are produced. These are parallel to the testes in men. Formation and Orientation Each ovary is the size of an almond and is located on one side of the pelvis before the ureter and internal iliac artery but after the external iliac artery. They are attached to either side of the uterus. They are connected and release eggs to fallopian tubes, though not attached, monthly during the menstrual cycle. They also produce...

Skin
2013-03-04 15:18:05

Skin is the outermost organ that protects and incases the tendons, ligaments, bones, muscles, etc. It is also the largest organ of the human body. Formation and Orientation Healthy skin consists of vitamins A, C, D and E, but in all skin, there are melanocytes which produce mesodermal cells. These cells allow for the absorption of UV rays. There are five main pigments that provide color in the skin’s many levels. Although not found in the skin, Oxyhemoglobin is found in the blood,...

Appendix
2013-03-04 15:05:59

The appendix is a dead-end tube like structure, ranging from 2 to 20 cm, that spans off the cecum of the colon. It is attached to the lower part of the large intestine. Formation and Orientation The appendix can be found in many mammals including marsupials, euarchontoglires (rodents) as wells as humans of course. It is also an organ that forms in the embryotic stage during pregnancy. McBurney’s Point, the point that is one-third the distance from infront and above the spinal cord...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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