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Latest Organs Stories

2010-10-22 01:32:52

Study shows a period early in a person's development when brain regions can switch functions A new paper from MIT neuroscientists, in collaboration with Alvaro Pascual-Leone at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, offers evidence that it is easier to rewire the brain early in life. The researchers found that a small part of the brain's visual cortex that processes motion became reorganized only in the brains of subjects who had been born blind, not those who became blind later in life. The...

2010-10-21 00:39:31

Some people may excel at riding a bike, tying a tie, or playing the piano, but those same people may find it difficult to explain or teach those skills to someone else. These motor skills are learned in one part of the brain, whereas classroom instruction and information read in a book are acquired in another area of the brain, explained F. Gregory Ashby, professor and chair of UC Santa Barbara's Department of Psychology. This second area of learning is the frontal cortex "“"“ the...

2010-10-19 17:16:58

A new way of seeing the world Scientists at The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital "“ The Neuro, McGill University have discovered that our brains have the ability to determine the shape of an object simply by processing specially-coded sounds, without any visual or tactile input. Not only does this new research tell us about the plasticity of the brain and how it perceives the world around us, it also provides important new possibilities for aiding those who are blind or with...

2010-09-27 15:26:59

Researchers in the Midwest are developing microelectronic circuitry to guide the growth of axons in a brain damaged by an exploding bomb, car crash or stroke. The goal is to rewire the brain connectivity and bypass the region damaged by trauma, in order to restore normal behavior and movement. Pedram Mohseni, a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at Case Western Reserve University, and Randolph J. Nudo, a professor of molecular and integrative physiology at Kansas...

2010-09-25 01:34:33

Playing video games for hours on end may prepare your child to become a laparoscopic surgeon one day, a new study has shown. Reorganisation of the brain's cortical network in young men with significant experience playing video games gives them an advantage not only in playing the games but also in performing other tasks requiring visuomotor skills. The findings are published in the October 2010 issue of Elsevier's Cortex (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cortex). Researchers from the Centre for...

2010-09-14 07:30:00

EAST NORRITON, Pa., Sept. 14 /PRNewswire/ -- Tengion, Inc. (Nasdaq: TNGN), a leader in regenerative medicine, today announced that Steven Nichtberger, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Tengion, will present at the upcoming UBS Global Life Sciences Conference on Monday, September 20, 2010, at 8:30am EDT. A live webcast of the presentation can be accessed under "Calendar of Events" in the Investors section of the Company's website at www.tengion.com. A replay of the...

2010-09-08 07:00:00

SAN FRANCISCO, Sept. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- Posit Science, the leader in clinically proven brain fitness programs, announced today that they have taken another innovative step towards improving cognitive function and brain fitness in adults with the release of their first cookbook, ThinkFood. Sponsored and published by Posit Science, ThinkFood features 50 brain-healthy recipes created by well-known food bloggers from the U.S. and beyond. ThinkFood is a beautiful, easy-to-use cookbook that...

2010-09-07 07:00:00

EAST NORRITON, Pa., Sept. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Tengion, Inc. (Nasdaq: TNGN), a leader in regenerative medicine, today announced that Steven Nichtberger, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Tengion, will present at the upcoming Rodman & Renshaw 12th Annual Healthcare Conference on Monday, September 13, 2010, at 2:50pm EDT. A live webcast of the presentation can be accessed under "Calendar of Events" in the Investors section of the Company's website at www.tengion.com. A replay...

2010-09-02 12:36:53

EMBL scientists uncover counterpart of cerebral cortex in marine worms Our cerebral cortex, or pallium, is a big part of what makes us human: art, literature and science would not exist had this most fascinating part of our brain not emerged in some less intelligent ancestor in prehistoric times. But when did this occur and what were these ancestors? Unexpectedly, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have now discovered a true counterpart of...

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2010-08-10 12:00:00

New research suggests that the brain has an interconnected network much like the Internet. Larry Swanson and Richard Thompson from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles isolated a small section of a rat's brain in the nucleus accumbens, which is a brain region associated with pleasure and reward. The scientists used a technique that hinges on the injection of "tracers" at precise points in the brain tissue.  These are molecules that do not interfere with the movement of...


Latest Organs Reference Libraries

Liver
2013-04-30 14:18:06

The liver is the organ in charge of processing, neutralizing and excreting certain secretions for the metabolic processes. Formation and Orientation The liver is considered to be both the largest internal organ and the largest gland in the human body. It is situated just below the diaphragm, to the right of the stomach and on top of the gallbladder. There are two ways blood can travel to and from the liver: the hepatic artery and the portal vein. The hepatic artery carries blood solely...

Esophagus
2013-04-30 13:37:01

The esophagus is the muscular tube that is located between the pharynx and the stomach that aids in digestion during swallowing. Formation and Orientation The esophagus is composed of four separate layers; the mucosa, submucosa, muscularis externa and the adventitia. The mucosa includes the stratified squamous epithelium, lamina propria and muscularis mucosae. The submucosa houses the esophageal glands and connective papillae. The muscularis externa is composed of three sublayers The...

Ovaries
2013-03-05 14:55:04

The ovaries are the two reproductive female organs where the eggs are produced. These are parallel to the testes in men. Formation and Orientation Each ovary is the size of an almond and is located on one side of the pelvis before the ureter and internal iliac artery but after the external iliac artery. They are attached to either side of the uterus. They are connected and release eggs to fallopian tubes, though not attached, monthly during the menstrual cycle. They also produce...

Skin
2013-03-04 15:18:05

Skin is the outermost organ that protects and incases the tendons, ligaments, bones, muscles, etc. It is also the largest organ of the human body. Formation and Orientation Healthy skin consists of vitamins A, C, D and E, but in all skin, there are melanocytes which produce mesodermal cells. These cells allow for the absorption of UV rays. There are five main pigments that provide color in the skin’s many levels. Although not found in the skin, Oxyhemoglobin is found in the blood,...

Appendix
2013-03-04 15:05:59

The appendix is a dead-end tube like structure, ranging from 2 to 20 cm, that spans off the cecum of the colon. It is attached to the lower part of the large intestine. Formation and Orientation The appendix can be found in many mammals including marsupials, euarchontoglires (rodents) as wells as humans of course. It is also an organ that forms in the embryotic stage during pregnancy. McBurney’s Point, the point that is one-third the distance from infront and above the spinal cord...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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