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Latest Origin of birds Stories

2009-06-22 12:46:30

U.S. and Chinese scientists say their discovery of a beaked, plant-eating dinosaur fossil shows how birds' three-fingered claws evolved from dinosaurs. The researchers said their finding also demonstrates theropod, or bird-footed, dinosaurs were more ecologically diverse in the Jurassic period than previously thought. This new animal is fascinating, and when placed into an evolutionary context it offers intriguing evidence about how the hand of birds evolved, said Professor James Clark of...

2009-06-09 12:51:49

Researchers at Oregon State University have made a fundamental new discovery about how birds breathe and have a lung capacity that allows for flight "“ and the finding means it's unlikely that birds descended from any known theropod dinosaurs.The conclusions add to other evolving evidence that may finally force many paleontologists to reconsider their long-held belief that modern birds are the direct descendants of ancient, meat-eating dinosaurs, OSU researchers say."It's really kind of...

2009-04-30 19:50:16

A team of researchers led by a North Carolina State University scientist has found soft tissue on a dinosaur skeleton. The team was led by Professor Mary Schweitzer, who in 2005 found soft tissue in the fossilized bone of a 68-million-year old Tyrannosaurus rex, The (Raleigh, N.C.) News & Observer reported Thursday. The findings will be published this week in the journal Science. As was the case with the T. rex bone, there was no DNA found to give scientists a glimpse into the giant...

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2009-03-19 07:15:00

Scientists have discovered that a small dinosaur which lived 100 million years ago in northeastern China was covered with course, hairlike fuzz, suggesting that feathers may have evolved much earlier than previously believed.  Although feathers and so-called "dinofuzz" have been previously identified in theropods, two-legged carnivores that are widely believed to be the ancestors of modern birds, the Chinese creature is only remotely related to theropods, and the hollow threads of...

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2009-02-16 09:02:37

About 150 million years ago, an evolutionarily hybrid creature, a dinosaur on its way to becoming a bird, died in what is now Germany, and become fossilized in limestone. About 150 years ago, the fossil of this "dinobird" was discovered and celebrated as proof of Charles Darwin's new theory of evolution. Now fast forward to a few weeks ago: The famous fossil, the Thermopolis specimen of Archaeopteryx lithographica, made its way by truck from the Wyoming Dinosaur Center to the Stanford...

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2009-01-13 14:13:53

Early dinosaurs were likely to have used their feathers for looks rather than for flight or staying warm, researchers reported on Monday. Researchers formed their hypothesis after studying two 125-million-year-old dinosaur fossils discovered in China. The Beipiaosaurus fossils depicted individual feathers as represented by a single broad filament, Xing Xu of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing and colleagues wrote in the Proceedings of the National...

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2008-10-23 08:25:00

The fossilized remains of a dinosaur about the size of a pigeon that may be the ancestor of birds has been discovered by archeologists in China. Scientists recovered 90 percent of the skeleton which was preserved in rock found in Ningcheng county in Inner Mongolia of northern China. The find was reported in an article in Nature. It has four limbs which lacked contour feathers that could be used for flight, making it a flightless creature. It probably live 176 to 146 million years ago in...

2008-09-13 03:00:11

By Perkins, Sid New study questions analyses of T. rex remains Three years ago, a team of scientists rocked the paleontology world by reporting the recovery of flexible tissue resembling blood vessels from a 68- million-year-old dinosaur fossil. Now, another group suggests that such pliable material could be something more mundane: a modern-day film of bacterial slime. The techniques used to assess such pliable materials are new to paleontologists, comments Matthew T. Carrano of the...

2008-07-30 06:00:24

By Dan Vergano New research is challenging claims made three years ago that scientists had discovered soft tissue remnants in the thighbone of a Tyrannosaurus fossil. A group led by paleontologist Mary Schweitzer of North Carolina State University in Raleigh garnered headlines in 2005 for reporting in the journal Science that they had found the remains of blood vessels inside the fossils unearthed in the Hell Creek Formation in Montana. Finding tissue preserved at least 65...

2008-02-08 16:15:01

Dinosaurs are living birds, nearly all scientists agree, but a debate still continues about when that first early bird glided or flew into the Mesozoic scene. Paleontologists who study fossils think the first modern birds evolved from dinosaurs about 60 million to 65 million years ago, right about the time most dinosaurs went extinct. But biologists who investigate DNA measure the origin of birds at about 100 million years ago. Scientists hoped that a new study analyzing all of...


Latest Origin of birds Reference Libraries

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2011-02-25 17:20:18

Scipionyx, meaning "Scipio's claw," and named after Scipione Breislak, is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Period of what is now Italy (113 million years ago). It was discovered in 1981 by amateur paleontologist Giovanni Todesco near Pietraroja, Italy, about 50 miles from Naples. Fossils were preserved in the Pietraroja limestone formation, well known for unusually well-preserved fossils. Todesco thought the fossilized remains were that of a bird. Unaware of the...

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2010-12-14 23:07:05

Protarchaeopteryx, meaning "before Archaeopteryx," is a genus of feathered theropod dinosaur from the Aptian age of the Early Cretaceous Period (124 million years ago). It was found in the Jianshangou bed of the Yixian Formation in what is now China. It was most likely more primitive than Archaeopteryx, making it a non-avian theropod dinosaur rather than a true avian bird. Protarchaeopteryx was about 3.3 feet in length, making it larger than Archaeopteryx. It had symmetrical feathers on...

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2009-08-18 22:05:50

Citipati, meaning "funeral pyre lord", is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Period of what is now Mongolia. It is known from the Djadokhta Formation in the Gobi Desert. It is one of the best known oviraptorids thanks to a number of well preserved fossils, some of which have been found in brooding positions on top of egg nests. These findings help solidify the link between non-avian dinosaurs and birds. It was first described by James M. Clark, Mark Norell, and Rinchen...

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2009-08-04 11:29:42

Anchiornis, meaning "near bird", is a genus of small, feathered dinosaur. The type species A. Huxleyi is named in honor of Thomas Henry Huxley, a scientist known for his early studies in the biological evolutionary relationship between birds and dinosaurs. The type specimen was described by paleontologist Xu Xing in 2008. The remains of Anchiornis were discovered in western Liaoning, China in sedimentary lake deposits. The age of the dinosaur is uncertain, but it is likely that it lived...

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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