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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 1:21 EDT

Orthoptera Reference Libraries

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Cricket
2005-09-08 14:48:50

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects which are related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera). They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae and are known for their chirp (which only male crickets can do; male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" instrument). They chirp by rubbing their wings over each other, and the song is...

Caelifera
2005-09-07 20:39:31

Caelifera, a herbivorous insect, is a suborder of the order Orthoptera. Commonly called grasshoppers in English, the sub-order includes short-horned grasshoppers, grasshoppers and locusts. Characteristics The Caelifera have antennae that are shorter than the body, and short ovipositors. Those species that make easily heard noises usually do so by rubbing the hind femurs against the...

Katydid
2005-09-07 18:59:19

Katydid is the common name of insects belonging to the grasshopper family Tettigoniidae, which contains over 6,800 species. Katydid are also known as "long horned grasshoppers" and "bush crickets." The term "katydid" is used mainly in the U.S., Canada, and Australia. The name "katydid" comes from the sound produced by species of the N. American genus Pterophylla (literally "winged leaf")....

Jerusalem cricket
2005-08-25 11:12:07

The Jerusalem cricket (Stenopelmatus) is a genus of large, flightless insects native to western United States, along the Pacific Coast, and south into Mexico. Because of its large, human-like head, it is commonly called the nino de la tierra (Spanish for "child of the earth"), or wó see ts'inii (Navajo for "skull insect"). It is also often called the potato bug, or alternatively the old...

Orthoptera
2005-08-25 09:40:19

The Orthoptera are an order of insects with incomplete metamorphosis, including the grasshoppers, crickets, locusts, and katydids. Many insects in this order produce sound (known as stridulation) by rubbing their wings against each other or their legs, the wings or legs containing rows of corrugated bumps. Their ears, located in the front legs, are interconnected in such a way that they are...

Weta
2005-08-25 08:33:40

The Weta family comprises over one hundred (generally) large insect species endemic to the New Zealand archipelago. Their name comes from the Maori language, but has acclimatized itself in New Zealand English, so the plural "wetas" may appear. Their physical appearance is that of a cross between a cockroach and a cricket with the addition of large legs. Weta can be found in environments...

Cricket
2005-07-13 16:57:18

Crickets, family Gryllidae (also known as "true crickets"), are insects related to grasshoppers and katydids (order Orthoptera). They have somewhat flattened bodies and long antennae. Crickets are known for the loud chirping noises they make by rubbing their wings together. Only male crickets sing as the male wings have ridges that act like a "comb and file" that produces a song that is species...