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Latest Osteoblast Stories

'Reversal Cells' Prepare For Bone Formation During Bone Remodeling
2013-06-06 21:09:31

Elsevier Health Sciences By analyzing biopsy specimens from patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and primary hyperparathyroidism, investigators have begun to pay increasing attention to "reversal cells," which prepare for bone formation during bone remodeling. The hope is that these reversal cells will become critical therapeutic targets that may someday prevent osteoporosis and other bone disorders. This study is published in the July 2013 issue of The American Journal of Pathology....

2013-04-10 13:24:01

Hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, is the primary cause of heart disease. It is caused by calcium accumulation in the blood vessels, which leads to arteries becoming narrow and stiff, obstructing blood flow and leading to heart complications. Although many risk factors for atherosclerosis have been identified, the cause is not known and there is currently no way to reverse it once it sets in. In a new study published 9th April in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers...

2011-06-21 12:42:40

Compounds in blueberries might turn out to have a powerful effect on formation of strong, healthy bones, if results from studies with laboratory rats turn out to hold true for humans. Jin-Ran Chen and his colleagues are exploring this idea in research funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) at the Arkansas Children's Nutrition Center (ACNC) in Little Rock. Chen is a principal investigator and lead scientist at the center's Skeletal Development Laboratory, and an assistant...

2011-03-14 16:19:56

New research shows that the Wnt receptor Frizzled-9 (Fzd9) promotes bone formation, providing a potential new target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The study appears online on March 14 in The Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org). Adult bones are maintained by a balance of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Although Wnt signaling affects this balance in mice and humans, the Wnt receptors involved remain unknown. A team of researchers led by Thorsten Schinke found...

2011-02-22 07:57:49

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ Scientists have discovered an unexpected connection between a hormone produced in bone and male fertility.  The study illustrates that the skeletal hormone known as osteocalcin boosts testosterone production to support the survival of the germ cells that go on to become mature sperm.According to Gerard Karsenty of Columbia University, the findings in mice offer the foremost evidence that the skeleton controls reproduction through the production of hormones....

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2011-02-18 11:32:02

Researchers have discovered an unexpected connection between a hormone produced in bone and male fertility.  The study shows that the skeletal hormone known as osteocalcin boosts testosterone production to support the survival of the germ cells that go on to become mature sperm. The researchers said the findings, which were reported in the February 18th issue of Cell, provide the first evidence that the skeleton controls reproduction through the production of hormones. According to...

2010-09-27 17:34:41

Aging disrupts the balance between bone formation and bone destruction, resulting in osteoporosis, which is characterized by reduced bone mass and increased risk of fracture. Recent data have suggested that this imbalance is a result of a decrease in formation of bone forming osteoblast cells from mesenchymal cells upon aging. Instead, these cells form more fat cells. Insight into this age-related switch in cell type generation has now been provided by a team of researchers, led by Hiroshi...

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2010-07-23 06:55:00

Our bones have much greater influence on the rest of our bodies than they are often given credit for, according to two new studies in the July 23 issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication. Both studies offer new insights into the interplay between bone and blood sugar, based on signals sent via insulin and a bone-derived hormone known as osteocalcin. Mice whose bones can't respond to insulin develop high blood sugar and insulin resistance, both hallmarks of diabetes. Those symptoms are tied to...

2010-07-22 15:31:44

A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers has found that insulin, the sugar-regulating hormone, is required for normal bone development and that it may provide a link between bone health and metabolic disease, such as diabetes. The study, headed by Thomas Clemens, Ph.D., the Lewis Cass Spencer Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery, and published online in the journal Cell, identified a unique communication between bone and pancreas cells through which insulin signaling in osteoblasts "” cells...


Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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