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Latest Ostracod Stories

Researchers Discover World’s Oldest Petrified Sperm In Australian Cave
2014-05-15 07:40:11

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online An international team of researchers working at a fossil site in northwest Queensland, Australia have come across a remarkable, unusual and perhaps even somewhat icky find – the world’s oldest petrified sperm sample. According to reports published by NBC News, the sperm came from a tiny crustacean known as an ostracod and dates back somewhere between 16 million and 23 million years to the early Miocene epoch. An ostracod,...

Parental Care From 450 Million Years Ago
2014-03-14 11:27:40

University of Leicester A portrait of prehistoric parenthood captured deep in the fossil record has been uncovered by an international team of scientists led by University of Leicester geologist Professor David Siveter. The 'nursery in the sea' has revealed a species new to science – with specimens preserved incubating their eggs together with probable hatched individuals. As a result, the team has named the new species Luprisca incuba after Lucina, goddess of childbirth, and alluding...

New Ostracod Species Discovered In Ancient Fossil Record
2012-12-12 13:44:19

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A team of British and American scientists have discovered the fossils of a tiny new species of animal in 425-million-year-old rocks located along the England-Wales border, according to the their report published in the journal Proceedings of The Royal Society B. The new species is an ostracod — a small crustacean related to crabs, lobsters and shrimps — and was exceptionally well preserved. Its fossil included a...

2009-06-18 15:16:39

In the competition for a partner, males typically have to vie with each other "“ be it with a colorful plumage, a large set of antlers or a seductive courtship dance. The females of some species, however, copulate with several males, so that rivals even after mating are still not defeated. So their sperm become rivals. Because greater size can increase the chance of fertilization, in some species truly giant sperm cells have evolved "“ some grow to be even larger than the male...

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2008-07-23 15:20:00

A range of fossils found in sediments on the slopes of Mount Boreas have helped refine the timing of the climate shift that gave rise to Antarctica's remarkable Dry Valleys. The famously ice-free terrain enjoyed more benign, tundra-like conditions 14 million years ago - but then flipped to the intensely cold setting seen today. Ancient lake-living shrimp-like creatures can pinpoint the big switch, scientists say.  They believe the ostracods would not have coped with a harsh, dry...


Word of the Day
mundungus
  • A stinking tobacco.
  • Offal; waste animal product; organic matter unfit for consumption.
This word comes from the Spanish 'mondongo,' tripe, entrails.