Quantcast

Latest Other Communication Disorders Stories

2013-06-12 16:08:32

Mechanism offers potential for interventions that could save hearing A team of NIH-supported researchers is the first to show, in mice, an unexpected two-step process that happens during the growth and regeneration of inner ear tip links. Tip links are extracellular tethers that link stereocilia, the tiny sensory projections on inner ear hair cells that convert sound into electrical signals, and play a key role in hearing. The discovery offers a possible mechanism for potential...

2011-11-21 23:07:23

Discovery may accelerate advances in understanding and treating hearing loss National Institutes of Health-funded researchers have identified two proteins that may be the key components of the long-sought after mechanotransduction channel in the inner ear–the place where the mechanical stimulation of sound waves is transformed into electrical signals that the brain recognizes as sound. The findings are published in the Nov. 21 online issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation....

2011-06-02 13:16:42

Swabbing a newborn's mouth for saliva can be used to quickly and effectively screen for cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, a leading cause of hearing loss in children, says research in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) found saliva correctly identified every baby born with the infection when liquid samples were used, and 97.4 percent of babies when the samples were dried. The research was funded by the National...

2011-05-24 22:55:49

NIH-supported investigators see no difference in outcome between oral and injected steroid delivery Direct injection of steroids into the middle ear for the treatment of sudden deafness was shown to be no more or less effective than oral steroids in restoring hearing levels in a large comparison study of patients. The study results appear in the May 25, 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The multicenter clinical trial was funded by the National Institute on...

2011-04-07 12:53:16

NIH-funded scientists report findings on olfactory clues to Alzheimer's disease, the sweet taste of anticipation, and the impact of autoimmune diseases on taste during research meeting in St. Pete Beach, Fla. What: Scientists supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), one of the National Institutes of Health, will be presenting their latest research findings at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS)....

72e5b5d177e96a995617a19f12675ac2
2011-01-13 05:55:00

Researchers have identified a way to ease tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, by stimulating a nerve in the neck while simultaneously playing certain sounds over an extended period of time.  These measures work together to essentially "reboot" the brain, the scientists said. Tinnitus affects as many as 23 million U.S. adults, including one in 10 seniors and 40 percent of military veterans.  The hallmark of the condition, which is currently incurable, is often a persistent ringing in...

2010-05-17 08:50:00

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla., May 17 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- May is Better Hearing Month, but millions of Americans are continuing to needlessly risk losing their hearing each day, warns audiologist Dr. Cindy Beyer. "Almost all hearing loss is due to the aging process or to noise, but only noise-induced hearing loss can be prevented," says Dr. Beyer, senior vice president of HearUSA, (Amex: EAR) a nationwide provider of hearing care and hearing aids. Ten million Americans have already...

2010-05-03 13:34:58

An in vivo study shows for the first time that there is a stress-response system within the cochlea that mirrors the signaling pathways of the body's fight or flight response. Researchers have identified a hormone-like signaling system of the inner ear that sets baseline hearing sensitivity and helps protect against noise-induced hearing loss. "Our research shows, for the first time, that the cochlea's protective mechanism is likely to be largely a locally-produced phenomenon. The current...

fb4eae66efb3855729e1bb57cb1d13db1
2010-02-11 09:00:00

Findings suggest common speech problem, in some cases, may actually be an inherited metabolic disorder Stuttering may be the result of a glitch in the day-to-day process by which cellular components in key regions of the brain are broken down and recycled, says a study in the Feb. 10 Online First issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The study, led by researchers at the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), part of the National Institutes of Health,...

2010-02-10 16:01:00

MEMPHIS, Tenn., Feb. 10 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The mystery behind a complex disorder called stuttering became a little clearer today with the announcement of the discovery of three genes for stuttering by Dennis Drayna, Ph.D., a director of the Stuttering Foundation and researcher for the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. (Photo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20100210/DC53167) "This research is important because it's another indication that...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
Related