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Latest Otolith Stories

Ancient Fish Fossils Give Insight Into Evolutionary History Of Gobioid Order
2013-05-16 13:51:46

LMU Fish fossils that are about 23 million years old give unprecedented insight into the evolutionary history of the gobioid order, one of the most species-rich groups among the modern bony fishes. Researchers led by paleontologist Professor Bettina Reichenbacher from the Division of Paleontology and Geobiology at LMU´s Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences have completed a comprehensive analysis of fish fossils which they assign to the group of bony fishes that includes...

Effects Of Changing Ocean pH May Result In Increase In The Hearing Sensitivity Of Fish
2013-04-19 14:26:57

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science Ocean acidification, which occurs as CO2 is absorbed by the world's oceans, is known to negatively impact a wide variety of marine animals ranging from massive corals to microscopic plankton. However, there is much less information about how fish may be impacted by acidification, should carbon emissions continue to rise as a result of human activities. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National...

Fish Ear Bones Can Offer Clues To Impacts Of Climate Change In Aquatic Environments
2012-11-28 11:38:09

CSIRO Australia The earbones, or 'otoliths', help fish to detect movement and to orient themselves in the water. Otoliths set down annual growth rings that can be measured and counted to estimate the age and growth rates of fish. "Otoliths can form the basis of new techniques for modelling fish growth, productivity and distribution in future environments," said Dr John Morrongiello of CSIRO's Wealth from Oceans Flagship, lead author of a paper published online in Nature Climate Change...

2011-03-25 12:01:23

Biologist Naroa Aldanondo studies the birth and beginnings and survival of the anchovy, in a thesis drawn up at Azti-Tecnalia and defended at the University of the Basque Country The more anchovies grow, the greater the probability of their survival, and it is precisely those born at the peak of the season of egg-laying and promptly moving out to the ocean area which enjoy optimum growth. These are the key factors to good recruitment, according to the conclusions of biologist Naroa Aldanondo...

2009-09-23 08:00:35

The organs of the inner ear have a direct effect on brain blood flow, independent of blood pressure and CO2 levels in the blood. Researchers writing in the open access journal BMC Neuroscience used a series of human centrifuge experiments to investigate the effects of stimulation of the otoliths and semi-circular canals on cerebrovascular response. Dr. Jorge Serrador, from Harvard Medical School, worked with a team of researchers, including NASA scientists, to carry out the tests. He said,...

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2009-06-26 06:05:00

For years scientists have observed the deleterious effects of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the oceans on shellfish and corals.  Now, a new study by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography has provided evidence that the physiological development of fish ears is also impacted by the gas. In the June 26 edition of the journal Science, researchers from the San Diego-based institute published a short paper outlining the results of experiments in which young white seabass were...

2008-10-02 03:00:25

By Longenecker, Ken Abstract: Estimating body size of fishes from remains recovered from piscivores, archaeological sites, and sedimentary deposits is desirable but rarely accomplished because the relationships between the size of a fish and its durable anatomical structures are largely unknown. Regression equations to predict the size or weight of 41 common Hawaiian reef fishes from sagittae (saccular otoliths) are presented. Data are also grouped into higher taxa to permit size...

2008-10-02 03:00:25

By Pondella, Daniel J II Froeschke, John T; Wetmore, Lynne S; Miller, Eric; Valle, Charles F; Medeiros, Lea Abstract: The yellowfin croaker, Umbrina roncador Jordan & Gilbert, 1882, is a common nearshore and surf-zone species in the southern California bight. Age was determined for individuals (n = 1,209) using annual increments in otoliths, and size at age was modeled using the von Bertalanffy growth curve (L^sub [infinity]^ = 307.754 mm, k = 0.278 yr^sup -1^, t^sub 0^ = -0.995 yr;...

2008-06-29 06:02:25

By Luntz, Stephen Increasing ocean acidity as a result of carbon emissions may be making it hard for fish to form symmetrical otoliths (ear bones), creating a further threat to the health of coral reef ecosystems as fish with asymmetrical ear bones struggle to find their way to the safety of coral reefs. Dr Monica Gagliano of the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) was part of a team investigating damselfish otoliths. At hatching they found that 59% had asymmetrical otoliths....

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2008-05-21 12:10:33

Fishery biologist Sandy Sutherland looks through the lens of the microscope at tiny sections of fish earbones, known as otoliths, each showing annual bands of growth. She carefully counts the bands to determine the age of the fish, then moves on to the next sample.  Known as an age reader, Sutherland is one of a small team at NOAA's Northeast Fisheries Science Center (NEFSC) whose aging work is critical to stock assessments needed to manage the nation's fishery resources in the Northwest...


Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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