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Latest Overdiagnosis Stories

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2009-03-19 16:10:00

The results of two large, long-awaited studies show that prostate cancer screening does not necessarily save lives, and in some cases may lead to unneeded treatments with serious side effects. But the studies - one in the U.S. and one in Europe -  are not likely to end the debate over the need for routine prostate cancer screening. Researchers conducting the U.S. study, which involved roughly 76,000 men, reported that the screening did not save lives.  But the European study, which...

2009-03-19 09:20:50

Screening for prostate cancer can reduce deaths by 20%, according to the results of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) published online 1700 hours CET, today 18 March (NEJM, Online First*). ERSPC is the world's largest prostate cancer screening study and provides robust, independently audited evidence, for the first time, of the effect of screening on prostate cancer mortality.The study commenced in the early 1990s involving eight countries "“...

2009-03-18 11:00:00

STOCKHOLM, Sweden, March 18 /PRNewswire/ -- - Attn: Healthcare Editors Screening for prostate cancer can reduce deaths by 20%, according to the results of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) published online 1700 hours CET 18 March (NEJM, Online First*). ERSPC is the world's largest prostate cancer screening study and provides robust, independently- audited evidence, for the first time, of the effect of screening on prostate cancer mortality....

2008-12-31 16:04:32

Despite efforts to promote early screening, low-income men may be waiting too long for prostate cancer screening. New research shows low-income men are initially diagnosed with advanced stage prostate cancer at significantly higher rates than the general population. With the widespread use of PSA screening, low-risk prostate cancer numbers have increased over the past 20 years. With treatment at an early stage, men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer have an 85 percent chance of being...

2008-10-09 06:00:17

By H. Gilbert Welch, M.D. In a U.S. presidential campaign that promises straight talk and no gimmicks, why do both candidates champion one of medical care's most pervasive myths? The myth is that like magic, preventive medicine will simultaneously reduce costs and improve health. It may sound like common sense. But it is still a myth. The term "preventive medicine" no longer means what it used to: keeping people well by promoting healthy habits, like exercising, eating a balanced diet...

2008-09-24 09:00:48

REHOVOT, Israel, September 24 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- BioView Ltd, from Rehovot, Israel, reported today results of its internal clinical trial of the non-invasive diagnostic test under development for early detection of lung cancer. In the trial a total of 76 sputum samples were collected from four groups of patients: 1. Healthy individuals that never smoked 2. Heavy smokers with no signs of lung cancer 3. Early stage lung cancer patients (Stage 1) 4. Advanced stage lung...

2008-09-03 12:00:07

By WILLIAM J CATALONA Many media reports followed a federal task force's announcement this month that there is insufficient medical evidence to assess the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening in men younger than 75 and that doctors should stop testing men over age 75. It's important to note that consideration was not given to the overwhelming body of emerging evidence that screening with PSA tests and digital rectal exams saves lives. Rates of death from prostate cancer and...

2008-08-31 12:00:14

By William J. Catalona The Washington Post Numerous media reports followed a federal task force's announcement this month that there is insufficient medical evidence to assess the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening in men younger than 75 and that doctors should stop testing men over age 75, It's important to note that consideration was not given to the overwhelming body of emerging evidence that screening with PSA tests and digital rectal exams saves lives. Rates of death...

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2008-08-06 06:05:00

By Tara Parker-Pope In a move that could lead to significant changes in medical care for older men, a national task force in the United States has recommended that doctors stop screening men aged 75 and older for prostate cancer because the search for the disease in that group is causing more harm than good. The guidelines, issued Monday by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, represent an abrupt policy change by an influential panel that had withheld any advice regarding screening for...

2008-08-05 09:00:03

By Tara Parker-Pope New York Times News Service In a move that could lead to significant changes in medical care for older men, a national task force Monday recommended that doctors stop screening men 75 and older for prostate cancer because the search for the disease in this group is causing more harm than good. The new guidelines, issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, represent an abrupt policy change by an influential panel that had withheld any advice regarding screening...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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