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Latest Overfishing Stories

2014-08-13 16:22:19

MIAMI, Aug. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The loss of sharks could contribute to the destruction of one of the planet's most under-appreciated sources of carbon storage -- seagrasses. While sharks are often sensationalized as voracious predators, it's their actual prey that poses a risk to seagrasses, according to FIU researchers. "Seagrasses around the world are under considerable threat -- from pollution to dredging and changes in water quality," said Mike Heithaus, interim...

2014-07-15 14:17:14

John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Aquaculture Is Source of Nearly Half the World’s Seafood As government agencies recommend greater consumption of seafood for its health benefits, a new analysis led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future urges medical and public health professionals to consider the environmental and health impact of seafood sourcing, particularly aquaculture, or the farming of fish, shellfish and crustaceans. The paper appears...

Belize's no-take Zones Help Rebuild Lobster, Conch, And Fish Populations
2014-07-14 03:50:14

Wildlife Conservation Society A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society shows that no-take zones in Belize can not only help economically valuable species such as lobster, conch, and fish recover from overfishing, but may also help re-colonize nearby reef areas. The report—titled "Review of the Benefits of No-Take Zones"—represents a systematic review of research literature from no-take areas around the world. The report was written by Dr. Craig Dahlgren, a recognized...

Overfishing Leaves Fisherman Scraping The Bottom Of The Barrel In The English Channel
2014-07-14 03:07:45

University of Plymouth Research reveals practice of 'fishing down the food-web' Decades of overfishing in the English Channel has resulted in the removal of many top predators from the sea and left fishermen 'scraping the barrel' for increasing amounts of shellfish to make up their catch. Sharks, rays, cod, haddock and many other species at the head of the food chain are at historic lows with many removed from the area completely. These are some of the findings of a study led by...

Steady Decline For Mediterranean Fish Stocks
2014-07-11 03:37:59

Cell Press While careful management has helped stabilize or even improve the state of fisheries resources in some parts of Europe, the situation in the Mediterranean has deteriorated over the past 20 years. In a new report evaluating nine fish species reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 10, scientists call for stringent monitoring of Mediterranean fishing activities, better enforcement of fisheries regulations, and advanced management plans in Mediterranean waters....

Better Ocean Stewardship Called For By Researchers
2014-05-16 03:21:48

Nova Southeastern University NSU researcher joins colleagues to urge caution when exploring/exploiting deep oceans It has been said that we know more about the surface of the moon than we do about our own planet's oceans. That especially applies to the deepest parts of our oceans – depths that are 200 meters or deeper. Researchers from organizations around the world who specialize in studying and exploring the deepest regions of our oceans have come together to pen a cautionary...

intensive fishing's collateral damage
2014-03-21 09:07:51

By Rob Jordan, Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment Biology researcher joins with other scientists to chart intensive fishing's collateral damage. Seabirds, sea turtles and marine mammals such as dolphins may not appear to have much in common, other than an affinity for open water. The sad truth is that they are all unintended victims – by-catch – of intensive global fishing. In fact, accidental entanglement in fishing gear is the single biggest threat to some species in...

Fate Of Fish Stocks In The Baltic Sea Determined By Salt Stratification
2014-02-19 15:39:07

GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel Why management strategies must take into account regional conditions In the Baltic Sea, two cod stocks evolve independently. Also the juveniles of two economically important flatfish species, flounder and plaice, live there within limited space. This is possible due to the irregular distribution of water masses of different salinity in this inland sea. Scientists of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Institute of...

2014-01-29 08:22:57

Promotes Reforms to Boost Fish Populations, Ensuring Sustainable Supplies of Fish for Food and Income Five-Year Commitment is the First Program to Simultaneously Reform Small-Scale and Industrial Fishing Practices, and Places Bloomberg Philanthropies Among Top 5 Global Oceans Funders NEW YORK, Jan. 29, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Bloomberg Philanthropies today announced the launch of the Vibrant Oceans initiative, a commitment of $53 million over five years to promote reforms to boost...

2014-01-08 17:21:40

Florida State University researchers have spearheaded a major review of fisheries data that examines the domino effect that occurs when too many fish are harvested from one habitat. The loss of a major species from an ecosystem can have unintended consequences because of the connections between that species and others in the system. Moreover, these changes often occur rapidly and unexpectedly, and are difficult to reverse. “You don’t realize how interdependent species are until it...


Latest Overfishing Reference Libraries

Albacore, Thunnus alalunga
2012-04-02 15:56:46

The Albacore, (Thunnus alalunga), also known as the Albacore Tuna, Albicore, Longfin, Albies, Pigfish, Tombo ahi, Binnaga, Pacific Albacore, German Bonito, Longfin Tuna, Longfin Tunny, and just Tuna, is a species of fish in the Scombridae family. It is the only species of tuna they is marketed as “white meat tuna” in the United States. It is found in open waters of all tropical and temperate oceans and the Mediterranean Sea. The adult Albacore measure up to 4.5 feet in length and...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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