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Latest Overwintering Stories

Monarch Butterfly Migration Tracked
2013-08-07 13:18:09

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Monarch butterflies are known for their annual migration that spans several generations and can extend from Canada to Mexico. Tracking these majestic butterflies across thousands of miles and several generations has proven difficult for lepidopterologists, but new research published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B has done just that and revealed new details about the majestic insect's life cycle in the process. Before the...

Monarch Butterflies Won't Migrate North Unless They Can Chill Out First In Mexico
2013-02-22 10:09:45

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Millions of monarch butterflies from across the eastern U.S. begin a southward migration each fall to escape the frigid temperatures of the northern boundary of their range. They travel up to 2,000 miles to reach an overwintering site in a very specific grove of fir trees in central Mexico. A new study from the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMass) suggests the butterflies require the exposure to coldness in the...

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2012-06-02 11:47:09

During the fall, hundreds of millions of monarch butterflies living in eastern North America fly up to 1,500 miles to the volcanic forests of Mexico to spend the winter, while monarchs west of the Rocky Mountains fly to the California coast. The phenomenon is both spectacular and mysterious: How do the insects learn these particular routes and why do they stick to them? A prevailing theory contends that eastern and western monarchs are genetically distinct, and that genetic...

38632_web
2011-12-03 12:17:36

In order to identify the flight routes of the birds, postgraduate Matthias Kopp, under the guidance of Dr. Peter, equipped South Polar skuas with geolocators in their breeding areas on King George Island, about 120 kilometers off the Antarctic Mainland. Thus he has been screening their position data over a period of several years, followed by an analysis together with British colleagues and a scientist from Switzerland. "With the help of these data we can now for the first time...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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