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Latest Ovipositor Stories

Fossil Evidence Indicates Fig Wasps Were Here Long Before Fig Trees
2013-12-06 07:57:54

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers are puzzled by a 115-million-year-old fossilized wasp from northeast Brazil. The puzzle rests in the wasp's ovipositor, the organ through which it lays its eggs. The fossilized wasp's ovipositor looks a lot like those of present-day wasps that lay their eggs in figs. The researchers say that the problem is that figs arose around 65 million years after this wasp was alive. The wasp belongs to the Hymenoptera superfamily...

New Study Presents New Wasp Species From The Distinctive Odontacolus And Cyphacolus Genera
2013-07-04 10:51:42

Pensoft Publishers The wasp family Platygastridae is a large group of tiny, exclusively parasitoid wasps distributed worldwide. The genera Odontacolus and Cyphacolus, belonging to this family, are among the most distinctive wasps because of the peculiar hump-like formation on the rear part of their bodies. Despite their intriguing body shape, the generic status of these two groups has remained unclear. A new extensive study published in the open access Zookeys presents a morphological...

2011-12-22 08:00:00

The Natural Sciences Magazine EurekaMag.com publishes articles in all areas of biological science. The latest articles cover Cicada which live in temperate to tropical climates and can cause damage to agricultural crops, shrubs, and trees, Maggots which are larva of flies attacking crops and food. The article on Winter Solstice covers a hemisphere's shortest day and longest night of the year, when the sun's daily maximum elevation in the sky is the lowest. Mannheim, Germany (PRWEB) December...


Latest Ovipositor Reference Libraries

European Bitterling, Rhodeus amarus
2013-10-15 12:33:35

The European Bitterling (Rhodeus amarus) is a temperate freshwater fish belonging to the Acheilognathinae sub-family of the Cyprinidae family. It originates from Europe, ranging from the Rhone River basin found in France to the Neva River found in Russia. It was originally described as Cyprinus amarus by Marcus Elieser Block in 1782, and has been referred to within scientific literature as Rhodeus sericeus amarus. It’s known simply as “the bitterling” within its native range, where it...

40_94cea10bb8467a49d1969ecb176c964a
2005-09-07 20:39:31

Caelifera, a herbivorous insect, is a suborder of the order Orthoptera. Commonly called grasshoppers in English, the sub-order includes short-horned grasshoppers, grasshoppers and locusts. Characteristics The Caelifera have antennae that are shorter than the body, and short ovipositors. Those species that make easily heard noises usually do so by rubbing the hind femurs against the forewings or abdomen, or by snapping the wings in flight. Tympana, if present, are on the sides of the...

40_d97d298f70e6e3a50cb57d05ec491255
2005-09-07 20:33:37

Apocrita is a suborder of insects in the order Hymenoptera. The Apocrita include wasps, bees and ants, and are comprised of many families. They include the most advanced Hymenoptera and are distinguished from the Symphyta by the narrow waist joining two segments of the abdomen. The ovipositor of the female either extends freely or is retracted, and is converted into a sting for both for defense and for paralyzing prey. Larvae are legless, and may feed either inside a host or in a nest....

37_381f3609ddcdbb9e697e387251e77b95
2005-07-14 11:39:06

Symphyta is a group of insects, a taxonomic suborder of the Hymenoptera. The Symphyta are commonly referred to as sawflies, and include insects belonging to several families. They are considered to be the most primitive Hymenoptera and are closely related to wasps, bees and ants, those being members of the suborder Apocrita. Sawflies are identifiable from most other Hymenoptera by the wide connection between the abdomen and the thorax. The common name comes from the appearance of the...

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Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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