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Muskox Ovibos moschatus
2012-10-01 10:05:00

The muskox (Ovibos moschatus), also known as the musk ox, is native to the Arctic areas of Canada, United Sates, and Greenland. Populations have been introduced into Norway, Sweden, and Siberia, but these are small. There was a population in Antarctica, but it was wiped out due to hunting and climate change, which caused its habitat to decline. Despite this, the United States Fish and Wildlife...

Shrub-ox Euceratherium collinum
2012-05-10 05:18:10

The shrub-ox (Euceratherium collinum) is a close relative of the modern musk-ox, and is an extinct member of the family Bovidae. It inhabited North America during the late Pleistocene, appearing before the first bovids entered North America from Eurasia. These muskoxen became extinct approximately 11,500 years ago. The shrub-ox was very large, approximately in between the sizes of a musk-ox...

Cattle
2006-12-14 13:19:49

Cattle (often called cows in contemporary usage) are domesticated ungulates (hoofed), a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. They are raised as livestock for meat (called beef and veal), dairy products (milk), leather and as draught animals (pulling carts, plows and the like). In some countries, such as India, they are subject to religious ceremonies and respect. It is...

Musk Ox
2005-06-02 11:56:43

The Musk Ox (Ovibos moschatus) is an arctic mammal of the Bovidae family, noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor of the male. It belongs to the Caprinae subfamily and is more closely related to goats than to oxen. Both sexes have long curved horns. Musk oxen are usually around 2 m long and 1 m high at the shoulder. The coat includes long guard hairs that reach almost to the ground....

Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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