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Oxides Reference Libraries

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Indium
2005-05-26 10:10:12

Indium is a chemical element in the periodic table that has the symbol In and atomic number 49. This rare, soft, malleable and easily fusible poor metal, is chemically similar to aluminium or gallium but looks more like zinc (zinc ores are also the primary source of this metal). Its current primary application is to form transparent electrodes from Indium tin oxide in liquid crystal displays....

Iron oxide
2005-05-26 10:06:59

There are a number of iron oxides: Iron oxides Iron(II) oxide or ferrous oxide (FeO) The black-coloured powder in particular can cause explosions as it readily ignites. Iron(III) oxide or ferric oxide (Fe2O3) known in its natural state as hematite or haematite, but also purified for use as a coating in magnetic audio and computer media, where it is known as ferric oxide. Also known as...

Limonite
2005-05-26 09:37:09

Limonite Limonite is a ferric hydrate of varying composition, the generic formula is frequently written as FeO(OH)·nH2O, although this is not entirely accurate as Limonite often contains a varying amount of oxide compared to hydroxide. Together with hematite, it is mined as ore for the production of iron. Limonite is heavy and yellowish-brown. It is not a true mineral, however, but a...

Magnetite
2005-05-26 09:20:28

Magnetite is a magnetic mineral form of both iron(II) oxide and iron(III) oxide or (iron(II,III) oxide), with chemical formula Fe3O4, one of several iron oxides and a member of the spinel group. Magnetite is the most magnetic of all the minerals on Earth, and these magnetic properties led to lodestone being used as an early form of magnetic compass. Small grains of magnetite occur in...

Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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