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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 16:09 EDT

Latest P-Phenylenediamine Stories

2014-04-09 23:27:16

DeepResearchReports.com adds “2014 Market Research Report on Global and China P-Phenylenediamine (PPD) Industry” and “2014 Deep Research Report on Global and China Unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) Industry” to its research database. Dallas, Texas (PRWEB) April 09, 2014 2014 Market Research Report on Global and China P-Phenylenediamine (PPD) Industry” is a professional and in-depth research report on the China P-Phenylenediamine (PPD) market. The report provides basic...

2008-08-13 00:00:18

U.S. doctors are warning black henna used in temporary tattoos can cause long-term skin problems. The tattoos, made with henna darkened with the chemical paraphenylenediamine, can cause blisters, eczema and permanent scarring, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported Tuesday. The American Academy of Dermatology Association has endorsed a ban on the paraphenylenediamine-adulterated henna tattoos. Dr. Sharon Jacob, a dermatologist at Rady Children's Hospital, said the chemical can result in...

2008-05-28 15:00:00

By LING, Jenny AN ALLERGIST is calling for warnings on hair dye labels to highlight the risks of chemical reactions to hair dye. Vincent Crump, of the Auckland Allergy Clinic, said prolonged use of hair dye, particularly permanent colours, could increase the chance of a severe allergic reaction. "People need to be aware if you're going to dye your hair -- especially if it's a permanent dye -- that you run that risk," he said. Dr Crump's comments come after The Dominion Post reported...

2008-03-24 12:01:21

By Dusty Ricketts, Northwest Florida Daily News, Fort Walton Beach Mar. 24--FORT WALTON BEACH -- Anyone considering getting a black henna tattoo might want to think twice. The Florida Department of Health has issued a warning against the use of p-Phenylenediamine, commonly referred to as PPD or black henna, because it can trigger allergic reactions. While traditional henna is made from a plant and has been used for hundreds of years to decorate the skin, black henna is a chemical used...

2006-07-04 08:59:59

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Using hair dye may increase the risk of a type of cancer known as lymphoma, a European study shows. "Our data suggest that personal use of hair coloring is associated with a small increase in lymphoma risk, particularly among women who started using hair coloring products before 1980," Dr. Silvia de Sanjose of the Catalan Institute of Oncology in Barcelona and colleagues write in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology. Past research has...