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Latest P53 Stories

2011-09-07 13:48:10

The protein p53 plays an essential role in the prevention of cancer by initiating the controlled death of a cell with damaged genes which is in danger to transform into a cancerous cell. The heat shock protein Hsp90, in turn, activates and stabilizes p53. Now scientists of the Technische Universität München (TUM) have discovered both the site where the two proteins interact and the interaction mechanism. The results of their work are reported in the current...

2011-08-16 12:19:04

Tumors that do not respond to chemotherapy are the target of a cancer therapy that prevents the function of two enzymes in mouse tumor cells, according to Pennsylvania medical researchers. "We've known for well over a decade that when tumors become hypoxic they become resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy," said Wafik S. El-Deiry, M.D. Ph.D., American Cancer Society Research Professor, Rose Dunlap Professor and chief of hematology/oncology, Penn State College of Medicine. "This is a huge...

2011-07-28 23:28:00

Centers collaborate to reveal unexpected genetic mutations Powerful new technologies that zoom in on the connections between human genes and diseases have illuminated the landscape of cancer, singling out changes in tumor DNA that drive the development of certain types of malignancies such as melanoma or ovarian cancer. Now several major biomedical centers have collaborated to shine a light on head and neck squamous cell cancer. Their large-scale analysis has revealed a surprising new set of...

2011-07-19 13:20:54

Scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of USC grow brain cells from skin Oncogenes are generally thought to be genes that, when mutated, change healthy cells into cancerous tumor cells. Scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) have proven that those genes also can change normal cells into stem-like cells, paving the way to a safer and more practical approach to treating diseases like multiple sclerosis and cancer with stem cell therapy. "The...

2011-07-15 14:23:16

A protein that appears to play a key role in the formation of lymphoma and other tumors by inhibiting a tumor-suppressing gene has been identified by a team of veterinary and human medicine researchers at the University of California, Davis. The researchers suggest that the newly identified protein may be a potential target for diagnosing and treating lymphoma in humans and animals. They will report their findings July 15 in the journal Genes & Development. "Results from this study...

2011-07-15 07:20:39

(Ivanhoe Newswire) "“ According to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, over 21,000 Americans died from lymphoma cancer last year. Lymphoma refers to a group of blood cancers that start in the lymphatic system, a network of lymph vessels and lymph nodes that play a vital role in the body's immune system. Researchers believe that a newly identified protein may be a potential target for diagnosing and treating lymphoma in humans and animals. The protein appears to play a key role in the...

2011-07-11 20:35:32

EDITOR'S PICK: Do-it-yourself brain repair following stroke Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability and death in the United States. A team of researchers "” led by Gregory Bix, at Texas A&M College of Medicine, College Station "” has identified a way to exploit one of the brain's self-repair mechanisms to protect nerve cells and enhance brain repair in rodent models of stroke. The authors suggest that this approach could provide a nontoxic treatment for stroke. The...

2011-07-07 20:28:34

University of Oregon-led team, using a genetic mosaic technique, sees glioma emerge from a specific cell line Using a mouse genetic system co-developed by researchers at the University of Oregon and Stanford University, a research team led by UO biologist Hui Zong has isolated the cellular origin for malignant glioma, a deadly human brain cancer. The discovery that oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are the point of origin is reported online July 7 ahead of regular print publication in...

2011-07-01 12:56:51

Salk Institute scientists show how regulation of a key damage response protein can make the difference between survival and death after radiation Scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have found clues to the functioning of an important damage response protein in cells. The protein, p53, can cause cells to stop dividing or even to commit suicide when they show signs of DNA damage, and it is responsible for much of the tissue destruction that follows exposure to ionizing...


Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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