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Latest P53 Stories

2011-03-29 16:57:41

Protein aggregation, generally associated with Alzheimer's and mad cow disease, turns out to play a significant role in cancer. In a paper published in Nature Chemical Biology, Frederic Rousseau and Joost Schymkowitz of VIB, K.U.Leuven and Vrije Universiteit Brussel describe that certain mutations of p53, an important tumor suppressor, cause the protein to misfold in a way that the proteins start to aggregate. This not only disrupts the protective function of normal p53, but of other related...

2011-03-21 06:00:00

BEVERLY, Mass., March 21, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Cellceutix Corporation (OTCQB: CTIX), a biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering and developing small molecule drugs to treat severe medical conditions including drug-resistant cancers, today announced that it will be presenting a poster titled "Kevetrin(TM), A Novel Small Molecule, Activates p53, Enhances Expression of p21, Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in a Human Cancer Cell Line" at the American Association for Cancer...

2011-03-15 16:05:36

Jean-Christophe Marine (VIB, K.U.Leuven) strongly argues against the use of Cop1-inhibitory drugs. The protein Cop1 has "“for a long time - been seen as an attractive drug target for cancer. But Jean-Christophe Marine found out that Cop1 acts as a tumor suppressor, and thus inhibits tumor formation. His new data will have direct implications for the development of cancer drug targets. Tumorigenesis: loss of control Tumors form when control over the cell division is lost; a process that...

2011-03-14 16:21:26

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators use a novel model system to show how specific mutations can induce glioma formation in multiple regions of the brain and to begin studying patient response to a new generation of targeted therapies Mutations in three pathways important for suppressing tumors cooperate to launch glioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor that strikes children and adults. But new research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists shows those changes...

2011-03-07 15:02:13

Burkitt's lymphoma is one of the most aggressive tumors affecting humans. Multiple alterations in genes that regulate cell proliferation rate explain its aggressive behavior. A new study reveals new molecular insight into the understanding and treatment of Burkitt`s lymphoma. The new finding concentrates on a genetic locus -- a piece of DNA with one or more genes which is the specific location of a gene or DNA sequence on a chromosome -- called INK4a/ARF locus. This locus encodes two...

2011-03-07 06:00:00

BEVERLY, Mass., March 7, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Cellceutix Corporation (OTCQB: CTIX) today reported that its flagship cancer compound, Kevetrin(TM), has demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity in the treatment of leukemia cells in a hematopoietic xenograft tumor model. The activity, once again, is attributed to the reactivation of p53, the "Guardian Angel" protein, which Cellceutix announced last week as a major breakthrough in cancer research. The data was presented to Cellceutix...

2011-03-02 20:32:17

Metabolic function for tumor suppressor points to new cancer therapeutics The gene for the protein p53 is the most frequently mutated in human cancer. It encodes a tumor suppressor, and traditionally researchers have assumed that it acts primarily as a regulator of how genes are made into proteins. Now, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine show that the protein has at least one other biochemical activity: controlling the metabolism of the sugar glucose, one of...

2011-03-02 06:12:00

BEVERLY, Mass., March 2, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Cellceutix Corporation (Pink Sheets: CTIX) today announced that it has received more data on Kevetrin(TM), the Company's flagship compound for the treatment of cancers. Analysis of the latest research shows Kevetrin(TM) is non-genotoxic, contrary to the majority of currently available chemotherapeutic drugs. Genotoxic drugs affect nucleic acids and alter their function. These drugs may directly bind with DNA or may indirectly lead to DNA damage...

2011-02-28 15:35:47

A small difference in DNA sequence predicts the degree of disability after a stroke, according to a paper published online on February 28 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (www.jem.org). Stroke, the consequence of disturbed blood flow to the brain, can impair speech, movement and vision, but it is currently difficult for clinicians to predict the severity of these side effects or the long-term prognosis. Strokes result in the death of brain cells called neurons. Angeles Almeida and...

2011-02-28 07:00:00

SAN ANTONIO, Feb. 28, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Advanced Cell Diagnostics, Inc. (ACD) today announced the results of its clinical study utilizing RNAscope(TM) technology to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 mRNA in routine clinical specimens of head and neck cancer. HPV status determined by the RNAscope(TM) HPV test was highly predictive of patient outcome and highly concordant with that determined by existing methods. Significantly, the RNAscope(TM) test under development demonstrated...