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Latest Pack rat Stories

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2014-07-22 03:30:57

University of Utah Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes. Woodrats that never ate the plants were able to do so after receiving fecal transplants with microbes from creosote-eaters, University of Utah biologists found. The new study confirms what biologists long have suspected: bacteria in the gut – and not just liver enzymes – are “crucial in allowing herbivores to feed on toxic plants,” says biologist Kevin Kohl, a...

Scientists Identify Factors Limiting Hybridization Of Closely-related Woodrat Species
2014-03-31 08:41:24

Wildlife Conservation Society A pair of new studies from the Wildlife Conservation Society, Idaho State University, and the University of Nevada Reno look at the surprising variety of factors that prevent two closely related species of woodrats from becoming a single hybrid species despite the existence of hybrid individuals where the two species come into contact. After finding that two closely related species, the desert and Bryant's woodrats, could interbreed and produce hybrid...

2013-09-28 23:03:26

ServiceMaster Restoration to collaborate with Matt Paxton on hoarding and estate clean up work. Baltimore, MD (PRWEB) September 28, 2013 Substantial hoarding can put individuals and their family at risk of health problems, injury and at times death. A high percentage of hoarders are 60 – 90 years old and do not consider themselves as hoarders; just simple pack rats or collectors. Hoarding may run in the family and accompany mental disorders which can be associated with obsessive...

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2011-08-09 07:35:00

How rodents survive arms race with toxic plants they eat Life is tough for woodrats in deserts of the U.S. Southwest. There are few plants for food, and those plants produce poison to deter rodents, insects and other animals. A new University of Utah study shows how certain woodrats put themselves on a diet to avoid poisoning: They sample a smorgasbord of toxic plants, eat smaller meals, increase time between meals and drink more water if it is available. "For decades, we have been trying to...

2009-04-07 08:38:32

U.S. biologists say they have narrowed their hunt for the genes that allow rodents to eat toxic creosote bushes in the southwestern United States. As that region grew warmer 18,700 to 10,000 years ago, juniper trees vanished from what is now the Mojave Desert, robbing packrats of their favorite food, the scientists said. Instead, the rodents are consuming toxic creosote. University of Utah Professor Denise Dearing and colleagues captured eight packrats -- also known as woodrats -- from each...

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2005-01-03 09:10:00

KEY WEST, Fla. (AP) -- The Florida Keys, already dealing with invasive exotics from melaleuca to iguanas, have added another to the list of unwanted newcomers: the African Gambian pouch rat. Biologists and conservationists in the Keys say the rodent needs to be eradicated, before it increases its range and harms native species that live in natural areas of the Keys. Although it is unclear how or why the rat - which can grow as big as a raccoon - was released on Grassy Key, biologists are...


Latest Pack rat Reference Libraries

Bushy-tailed Woodrat, Neotoma cinerea
2012-07-27 15:58:15

The bushy-tailed woodrat (Neotoma cinerea) is also known as the packrat or the woodrat. It is native to the United States and Canada. Its range extends from arctic Canada south to northern Arizona. It also extends to the far eastern portions of Nebraska and the Dakotas. It is able to live in many types of habitats from deserts to boreal forests, but it prefers to live in rocky areas like cliffs or rocky fields, and it can also be found in abandoned mines or buildings. It will inhabit open...

White-Throated Woodrat, Neotoma albigula
2012-07-23 20:00:26

The white-throated woodrat (Neotoma albigula) can be found in a range that extends from Central Mexico in the South to Colorado and Utah in the North. Its western range extends from Texas to southeastern California, but it does not occur in the eastern areas of the United States.  Populations of these rats occurring east of the Rio Grande in New Mexico and Trans-Pecos Texas are classified as the white-toothed woodrat. The white-throated woodrat holds fifteen subspecies that occur throughout...

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