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Latest Pair bond Stories

Owl Monkeys Don't Cheat
2014-03-19 14:44:02

University of Pennsylvania Intensive fathering plays a role True monogamy is rare in the animal kingdom. Even in species that appear to "mate for life," genetic maternity and paternity tests have revealed that philandering often takes place. Yet a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers shows that Azara's owl monkeys (Aotus azarae) are unusually faithful. The investigation of 35 offspring born to 17 owl monkey pairs turned up no evidence of cheating; the male and female...

Monogamous Owl Monkeys Reproduce More Than Those With Multiple Partners
2013-01-25 11:12:27

University of Pennsylvania Breaking up is hard to do – and can be detrimental to one´s reproductive fitness, according to a new University of Pennsylvania study. Focusing on wide-eyed, nocturnal owl monkeys, considered a socially monogamous species, the research reveals that, when an owl monkey pair is severed by an intruding individual, the mate who takes up with a new partner produces fewer offspring than a monkey who sticks with its tried-and-true partner. The findings...

Monogamy Evolved From Chest-Thumping To Caregiving
2012-05-29 12:14:10

John Neumann for RedOrbit.com Chest-thumping and grunting alpha males, a study suggests, may be losing the battle for preferable females to males who can demonstrate caregiving and the ability to provide for a family, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The research team says they have demonstrated mathematically that the transition to pair-bonding was based on female choice and faithfulness, so that providing for females became a...

2012-05-28 19:26:11

Faithful females who choose good providers key to evolutionary shift to modern family, study finds In early human evolution, when faithful females began to choose good providers as mates, pair-bonding replaced promiscuity, laying the foundation for the emergence of the institution of the modern family, a new study finds. The study helps answer long-standing questions in evolutionary biology about how the modern family, characterized by intense, social attachments with exclusive mates,...

Promiscuousness Results In Genetic Trade-up, More Offspring
2011-09-01 10:23:31

  It's all about the grandkids! That's what a team led by an Indiana University biologist has learned about promiscuous female birds and why they mate outside their social pair. Many humans find the idea of mating for life a romantic ideal, but in the natural world, non-monogamous relationships may have their benefits. According to new research published online Aug. 31 in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, IU postdoctoral research associate Nicole Gerlach and colleagues have...

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2011-06-16 07:49:16

It is assumed that many bird species are monogamous, yet infidelity is a widespread phenomenon. The advantage for the male seems obvious as in this way he can increase the number of his offspring. A female, however, mostly faces costs. The cuckolded partners often reduce their parental care. In addition, the extra lovers also may transmit diseases. Nevertheless, some females actively seek such contacts. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen investigated a large...

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2009-10-08 07:55:00

Discovery may lead to understanding of dinosaur mating habits Alligators display the same loyalty to their mating partners as birds reveals a study published Oct. 7 in Molecular Ecology. The ten-year-study by scientists from the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory reveals that up to 70% of females chose to remain with their partner, often for many years. The team, led by Drs. Travis Glenn, Ruth Elsey, Tracey Tuberville and Stacey Lance, spent a decade examining the mating system of alligators...

2008-03-20 23:55:00

News of politicians' extramarital affairs seems to be in no short supply lately, but if humans were cut from exactly the same cloth as other mammals, a faithful spouse would be an unusual phenomenon. Only 3 percent to 5 percent of the roughly 5,000 species of mammals (including humans) are known to form lifelong, monogamous bonds, with the loyal superstars including beavers, wolves and some bats. Social monogamy is a term referring to creatures that pair up to mate and raise offspring but...

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2008-01-28 16:27:24

Forgetful Casanovas are lucky in love. At least that's how University of Florida researchers interpret the results of new research on the mating habits and nervous systems of prairie voles. An article about the research, which examined both the voles' behavior and their brains, appears in this week's edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Prairie voles, aka Microtus ochrogaster, are common native rodents in the central U.S. and southern Canada. Because they mate for...