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Latest Palaeognathae Stories

Extinct Moa Females Up To Three Times Larger Than Males
2013-04-10 13:30:01

For New Zealand’s extinct, flightless giant moa, females often weighed three times as much as her male suitors say researchers, exhibiting an extreme form of sexual dimorphism.

2008-09-11 18:01:43

Ostriches, emus, kiwis and other winged non-flyers might seem to be birds of a feather, sharing similar evolutionary origins, but the story could turn out to be much weirder, with perhaps numerous flying ancestors.

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2008-09-04 11:38:18

Large flightless birds of the southern continents – African ostriches, Australian emus and cassowaries, South American rheas and the New Zealand kiwi – do not share a common flightless ancestor as once believed.


Latest Palaeognathae Reference Libraries

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2006-10-19 13:26:41

The Rhea is a large flightless bird native to South America. American Rheas live in grassland, savanna, scrub forest, chaparral, and even desert, but prefer areas with at least some tall vegetation. Darwin's Rhea lives in areas of open scrub in the grasslands of Patagonia and on the Andean plateau. It is classified as endangered throughout its range. The Common Rhea, Rhea americana, is not only the largest species of rhea, but also the largest bird in the Americas. Adults weigh up to 66...

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Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.