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Latest Paleoanthropology Stories

519ffcb6ded57814d7abc7b2c0ada2b81
2009-02-07 07:35:00

Digital X-rays of Lucy, the skeletal remains of a human who lived 3.2 million years ago, could provide answers about how our ancestors began walking, said scientists at the University of Texas in Austin on Friday. Lucy, discovered in 1974 in Ethiopia, is the best-preserved example of the pre-human species Australopithecus.  Scientists hope that examining a "virtual" Lucy might provide clues about her lifestyle. The researchers, who collaborated with the Ethiopian government, obtained the...

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2009-01-25 15:03:38

Officials from the Seattle Science Center paid millions to show the fossil remains of one of the earliest known human ancestors, but the exhibit failed to produce the expected returns. President Bryce Seidl said on Friday the Pacific Science Center faces a half-million-dollar loss resulting in layoffs of 8 percent of the staff, furloughs and a wage freeze only halfway through the five-month exhibit. The museum spotlighted the 3.2 million-year-old fossilized partial skeleton of a species with...

2008-03-24 01:56:49

A 6 million-year-old early relative of modern humans apparently walked on two feet, pushing back the origins of so-called bipedalism, according to a new study of a fossil found in Kenya. "I would say at this point it's the earliest fossil hominin that we can clearly identify as bipedal," said paleoanthropologist William Jungers of Stony Brook University, who conducted a quantitative analysis with Brian Richmond of George Washington University of a fossilized femur bone from the...

2008-02-18 09:00:00

Even before they are born, all people carry genetic baggage, genes that were useful to distant, non-human ancestors but are hopelessly outdated, even harmful, to humans as they live today. Chicago scientist Neil Shubin calls this inheritance our "inner fish." People hiccup, he explains, because of a design malfunction in a nervous system and breathing apparatus passed down from fish and tadpoles. Human males are vulnerable to hernias because of their awkward setup for toting around...

5ade3cd70a24c7e09fd67632b49670b81
2008-02-10 00:00:00

A 40,000-year-old tooth, discovered in southern Greece, may suggest that Neanderthals were more mobile than was once assumed. The tooth is part of the first and only Neanderthal remains to be found in Greece. Researchers say that it shows that the ancient human had spent part of its life away from where it died.. "Neanderthal mobility is highly controversial," said paleoanthropologist Katerina Harvati at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Some experts...

2007-10-18 09:00:16

By SETH BORENSTEIN By Seth Borenstein The Associated Press In one of the earliest hints of "modern" living, humans 164,000 years ago put on primitive makeup and hit the seashore for steaming mussels, new archaeological finds show. Call it a beach party for early man. But it's a beach party thrown by people who weren't supposed to be advanced enough for this type of behavior. What was found in a cave in South Africa may change how scientists believe Homo sapiens marched into...

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2007-10-17 12:10:00

WASHINGTON -- In one of the earliest hints of "modern" living, humans 164,000 years ago put on primitive makeup and hit the seashore for steaming mussels, new archaeological finds show. Call it a beach party for early man. But it's a beach party thrown by people who weren't supposed to be advanced enough for this type of behavior. What was found in a cave in South Africa may change how scientists believe Homo sapiens marched into modernity. Instead of undergoing a revolution into modern...

15898c65337619a0eb04a406128dd0531
2007-08-25 00:50:00

HOUSTON -- In the Ethiopian language, she is called Dinknesh - a name that means the wonderful, the fabulous, the precious. But to most of the world, she is known as Lucy, a 3.2 million-year-old fossil whose discovery 33 years ago yielded then-unparalleled insights to the origins of humankind. Next week, the iconic set of bones will be the star of a much-hyped exhibit that is pitting the Houston Museum of Natural Science and the Ethiopian government against the world's scientific community....

2007-08-12 12:19:32

By Khaled Kazziha Associated Press NAIROBI, Kenya -- One of the world's leading paleontologists denounced Ethiopia's decision to send the Lucy skeleton on a six- year tour of the United States, warning that the 3.2 million-year- old fossil will likely be damaged no matter how careful its handlers are. The skeleton was quietly flown out of Ethiopia last week for the U.S. tour. Paleontologist Richard Leakey joined other experts in criticizing what some see as a gamble with one of the...

2bdc954a6473669a7a82812d94c5dae81
2006-10-25 00:00:00

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- One of the world's most famous fossils - the 3.2 million-year-old Lucy skeleton unearthed in Ethiopia in 1974 - will go on display abroad for the first time in the United States, officials said Tuesday. Even the Ethiopian public has only seen Lucy twice. The Lucy exhibition at the Ethiopian Natural History Museum in the capital, Addis Ababa, is a replica while the real remains are usually locked in a vault. A team from the Museum of Natural Science in Houston, Texas,...


Latest Paleoanthropology Reference Libraries

Neanderthals
2013-10-03 16:03:35

The Neanderthals or Neandertals are an extinct species or subspecies of the genus Homo which is closely related to modern humans. They are known from fossils, dating back from the Pleistocene period, which have been found in Europe and parts of western and central Asia. The species gets its name from Neandertal, “Neander’s Valley”, the location in Germany where it was first uncovered. Neanderthals are classified either as a subspecies of Homo sapiens or as a distinct species of the...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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