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Latest Paleocene Stories

2014-06-25 23:03:37

Dr. Robert Anemone, head of the Department of Anthropology at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, breaks new ground as he teams up with a geographer and employs satellites, computers and drones to pinpoint Eocene-era fossils in Wyoming's Great Divide Basin. Greensboro, NC (PRWEB) June 25, 2014 Paleontologist Robert Anemone’s wrong turn turned out to be a happy accident that led him to a rich cache of 50 million-year-old fossil mammals. That was back in 2009 as he and his...

reconstruction of Dormaalcyon latouri
2014-01-07 04:06:08

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Over 250 teeth and ankle bone fossils discovered in Belgium have allowed researchers to gain new insight into some of the best-known and most-loved mammals on Earth, according to a new study appearing in the latest edition of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. According to the study authors, the group of mammals known as carnivoraforms (which includes creatures such as cats, dogs, bears and seals) can trace its roots back to...

Dwarfism In Mammals Also Occurred During Second Warming Period
2013-11-03 05:03:03

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While scientists have known for several years that some mammals became smaller during a period of warming known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), researchers from the University of Michigan have found a second instance of mammalian “dwarfing” attributable to increasing temperatures. During the PETM, which occurred approximately 55 million years ago, mammals such as primates and groups that include deer and horses...

Prehistoric Fossil Discovery Reveals Details About Earth's Most Successful Mammal Lineage
2013-08-16 14:55:53

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The 160 million-year-old fossil of a newly described species has revealed new details about the most successful mammalian lineage in Earth’s history. Multituberculates were a group of extremely diverse rodent-like mammals, ranging from tree dwellers to fastidious burrowers. They existed for about 120 million years before being out-competed into extinction by more modern mammals in the Oligocene epoch around 35 million years ago....

Oceans May Change Drastically In The Future
2013-08-06 05:37:31

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study, led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography, reveals the look of the oceans will change drastically in the future as the coming greenhouse world alters marine food webs and gives certain species advantages over others, if history's closest analog is any indication. Richard Norris, paleobiologist at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, worked with an international team of scientists to show the ancient...

2012-04-02 21:04:05

A series of global warming events called hyperthermals that occurred more than 50 million years ago had a similar origin to a much larger hyperthermal of the period, the Pelaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), new research has found. The findings represent a breakthrough in understanding the major “burp” of carbon, equivalent to burning the entire reservoir of fossil fuels on Earth, that occurred during the PETM. “As geologists, it unnerves us that we don´t know...

Climate Change Drove Shrinkage In Ancient Horse
2012-02-24 05:39:51

The ancient sifrhippus, the earliest known horse, lived around 50 million years ago. It was very distinct in its appearance because it was only about the size of a modern day house cat, weighing in around 12 pounds. The horse lived in what is known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), a 175,000 year period where the Earth's atmospheric temperature rose by about 10 degrees Fahrenheit, caused by a great release of carbon into the atmosphere and oceans. In response to the...

Mammalian Evolution Mirrors Climate Change
2011-12-27 05:39:51

A recent study by an international group of evolutionary biologists has pointed to six broad yet distinct ℠waves´ of climate-induced mammalian diversity in the last 65 million years of evolution. Researchers say that extended periods of warming and cooling appear to signal the shift from one dominant grouping of mammals to the next. In the online version of the journal The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Professor Christine Janis of Brown University and a...

2011-08-16 15:20:06

From hot pink to traditional French and Lady Gaga's sophisticated designs, manicured nails have become the grammar of fashion. But they are not just pretty "” when nails appeared on all fingers and toes in modern primates about 55 million years ago, they led to the development of critical functions, including finger pads that allow for sensitive touch and the ability to grasp, whether it's a nail polish brush or remover to prepare for the next trend. In a new study co-authored by...

9098b6a5ef59fb5f4965c95594235d4d
2011-06-15 13:25:00

Researchers have pinpointed the timing of the start of an ancient global warming episode known as the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The early part of the Cenozoic era witnessed a series of transit global warming events called hyperthermals.  The most severe of these was the PETM at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary, which took place around 56 million years ago. Over a 20,000-year period, ocean temperatures rose globally by about 41 degrees Fahrenheit.  The team said one...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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